Archive for the ‘Youth Vote’ Category

>Back from DC in an activist frame of mind

October 15, 2009

>Having just returned from a protest march in which 200,000 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Americans marched for equal rights, with the profound reminders of similar protests in view everywhere you go in Washington (the Mall, the Wall, the Lincoln Memorial), I’m still in an activist frame of mind.

For my first two reports on the march, including a slide show and Lady Gaga, visit here and here.

Tens of thousands of young people took part in this march, and among the young it doesn’t matter if one is gay or straight, they just want equality.

When I was growing up, some of us wanted equality, too, and inequality at the time was defined along racial lines. Racial differences are obvious, and young people today are growing up without the racial prejudices so many of us older people were surrounded by. Many older people who hold animosity toward gays do so as a hold over from the way they or their peers felt about those of other races when they were young.

So when it comes to sexual differences, young people don’t have that prejudiced background that they can transfer to the GLBT community.


And here’s another comparison between the older generation and the younger one. The signs at Glenn Beck’s 9-12 rally, attended mostly by older people, were negative, racist and hateful. The signs at the National Equality March, attended mostly by young people, were peaceful and uplifting.

“It’s not about who you love, it’s about do you love,” the sign reads.


Last night on PBS, American Masters featured Joan Baez followed by Pete Seegar. Nothing gets an old hippie charged up like hearing those two sing again.

The Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington sang several of the same songs that Pete Seegar was known for.

Equality is coming, there is no doubt.

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Clinton Seeking Youth Vote, Women’s Support

January 14, 2008

This post should be forwarded to young voters, and female voters and, well, all voters. Hillary Clinton is making inroads with the so called youth vote and recently had an online event where she addressed questions submmitted by facebook users. Here is a five or six minute youtube video where the candidate addresses questions posed to her.

Clinton addresses the following subjects here: genocide in Darfur, making college more affordable, creating green collar jobs, combating the upcoming recession and why she is the best candidate to bring change.

“She closes with “I want to reclaim the future for America, and that’s really about you more than it is about me. And I’m going to do everything I can to make that happen.”

Here is the youtube link link that you can send to your friends, or you can just forward Bessemer Opinions to them.

And Hillary still appeals to women, regardless of their age, and this column by Madeleine M. Kunin shows why Clinton’s appeal among women was so much greater in New Hampshire than in Iowa.

Kunin is the former governor of Vermont, and she suspects that in states that have a good history of electing women to statewide office or sending them to Congress in Washington, that Clinton will do better than in states that do not have record of electing women. Iowa is one such state, one of only two (Mississippi is the other) that has never elected a woman to Congress or the governor’s seat. New Hampshire has elected a woman governor three times and has the nation’s second highest percentage of women in it’s legislature (Kunin’s state, Vermont, ranks first).

I think that since women’s roles in politics (and elsewhere) are still repressed in much of the south, including Alabama, that Clinton will have a fight on her hands attracting huge numbers of women voters, but it is a fight that is winnable. South Carolina may tell us a lot about this, but Florida (if you consider it a southern state) has five women in Congress and their state legislature is 23.1% women. The women in Florida may give Hillary their support.

If I had the time I would research each state regarding these parameters and come up with an prediction, but there are too many other variables influencing this race.

So forward this to your female friends as well.

And for all voters, here is a good piece by Robert Farmer, Democratic bigwig. He was previously supporting Barack Obama, but has switched to Hillary Clinton’s camp. This was printed in the Washington Post after the Iowa Caucus, on the day of the New Hampshire primary, before we knew Hillary had won. Farmer has considered electability in his decision and his editorial is worth reading.

>Clinton Seeking Youth Vote, Women’s Support

January 14, 2008

>This post should be forwarded to young voters, and female voters and, well, all voters. Hillary Clinton is making inroads with the so called youth vote and recently had an online event where she addressed questions submmitted by facebook users. Here is a five or six minute youtube video where the candidate addresses questions posed to her.

Clinton addresses the following subjects here: genocide in Darfur, making college more affordable, creating green collar jobs, combating the upcoming recession and why she is the best candidate to bring change.

“She closes with “I want to reclaim the future for America, and that’s really about you more than it is about me. And I’m going to do everything I can to make that happen.”

Here is the youtube link link that you can send to your friends, or you can just forward Bessemer Opinions to them.

And Hillary still appeals to women, regardless of their age, and this column by Madeleine M. Kunin shows why Clinton’s appeal among women was so much greater in New Hampshire than in Iowa.

Kunin is the former governor of Vermont, and she suspects that in states that have a good history of electing women to statewide office or sending them to Congress in Washington, that Clinton will do better than in states that do not have record of electing women. Iowa is one such state, one of only two (Mississippi is the other) that has never elected a woman to Congress or the governor’s seat. New Hampshire has elected a woman governor three times and has the nation’s second highest percentage of women in it’s legislature (Kunin’s state, Vermont, ranks first).

I think that since women’s roles in politics (and elsewhere) are still repressed in much of the south, including Alabama, that Clinton will have a fight on her hands attracting huge numbers of women voters, but it is a fight that is winnable. South Carolina may tell us a lot about this, but Florida (if you consider it a southern state) has five women in Congress and their state legislature is 23.1% women. The women in Florida may give Hillary their support.

If I had the time I would research each state regarding these parameters and come up with an prediction, but there are too many other variables influencing this race.

So forward this to your female friends as well.

And for all voters, here is a good piece by Robert Farmer, Democratic bigwig. He was previously supporting Barack Obama, but has switched to Hillary Clinton’s camp. This was printed in the Washington Post after the Iowa Caucus, on the day of the New Hampshire primary, before we knew Hillary had won. Farmer has considered electability in his decision and his editorial is worth reading.