Archive for the ‘Spring’ Category

>Early spring bloomers

March 3, 2011

>The storm did not do the damage that I feared, and Spring is getting closer and closer.

Here are some more blooming things. We have two of these Japanese magnolias. This one is darker than the one I pictured earlier this week.

The flowers are really loaded with color.

These ornamental cabbage or kale really last the entire winter season and even at the end of their days they add a nice touch to the garden.

The pansies are another winter flower here, but this spring they have really put on a show.

Here is a solid yellow one in an old concrete planter Glenn gave me after his house burned. One of the outdoor pieces that thieves didn’t steal.

Lenten Rose is an early bloomer. I was told that Dr. McElroy, the former owner of this house, had Lenten roses, and though I never found any of his, I planted these as a remembrance.

I am very grateful to Dr. McElroy (who lived here from the 1960’s until his death in 2000) and to Col. Huey (who lived in this house from 1895 until his death in the mid 1900’s) for the garden that they created. There are many unusual plants, and one is this leather leaf mahonia. It’s not rare, but there are so many of them here, and some are very tall. They are blooming now, with these yellow flowers that will be replaced with blue berries that the birds love.


Peach trees have beautiful flowers. We haven’t gotten any edible peaches from this tree, which is just 3 years old. Maybe this year.

Quince, on the other hand, produces little apple like fruits. We never use them, but maybe this year I’ll can some quince jelly.

A red quince.

Snowbells. There are little clumps of these scattered around the yard.


One of the many varieties of daffodil or narcissus.


Next up…azaleas…and then roses.

>Spring Flowers and the Dove…Revealed

March 21, 2008

>Over the next few months you will from time to time be seeing new pictures of the same plants flowering that were pictured last year. I hope you don’t mind.

Over the next two weeks some major changes will be taking place along the 19th Steet side of the property, as we clear out some unhealthy, unattractive trees and (sorry) wisteria (don’t worry, there will still be plenty to bloom) and plant a row of Italian Cypress trees along the fence line (inside the fence). We already have a row of Oak Leaf Hydrangeas planted between the fence and the sidewalk, that was “phase one” of the project.

Phase three of this project will be replacing the fence. A normal person might do that first, but …

In the meantime, this iris is blooming, and I was afraid it wouldn’t because we had to move some of them and disturb the rest of them when the deck was built last year.


One of the surest signs of Spring, which is officially here now, is the blooming of the Redbud tree. Last year I mentioned that this one was blooming for the first time, but now it is much bigger and has a wealth of blooms on it. but have you ever looked at the flowers real closely?

Another early bloomer but not as common is the Dwarf Flowering Almond. Here is a close up of the flower. If anyone wants one of these, they produce lots of blooming suckers which I assume can be dug up and transplanted.

And if anyone wants Aloe plants, I am dividing a huge one and will have plenty to give away. Might not be in pots, but they’re free.

Those doves that I was watching turn out to be Eurasian Collared Doves, not the Ringed Turtle Doves I was hoping for. Still, it’s kind of neat to have these different looking guys visiting (and I believe nesting) nearby. Here is one in flight.

Spring Flowers and the Dove…Revealed

March 21, 2008

Over the next few months you will from time to time be seeing new pictures of the same plants flowering that were pictured last year. I hope you don’t mind.

Over the next two weeks some major changes will be taking place along the 19th Steet side of the property, as we clear out some unhealthy, unattractive trees and (sorry) wisteria (don’t worry, there will still be plenty to bloom) and plant a row of Italian Cypress trees along the fence line (inside the fence). We already have a row of Oak Leaf Hydrangeas planted between the fence and the sidewalk, that was “phase one” of the project.

Phase three of this project will be replacing the fence. A normal person might do that first, but …

In the meantime, this iris is blooming, and I was afraid it wouldn’t because we had to move some of them and disturb the rest of them when the deck was built last year.


One of the surest signs of Spring, which is officially here now, is the blooming of the Redbud tree. Last year I mentioned that this one was blooming for the first time, but now it is much bigger and has a wealth of blooms on it. but have you ever looked at the flowers real closely?

Another early bloomer but not as common is the Dwarf Flowering Almond. Here is a close up of the flower. If anyone wants one of these, they produce lots of blooming suckers which I assume can be dug up and transplanted.

And if anyone wants Aloe plants, I am dividing a huge one and will have plenty to give away. Might not be in pots, but they’re free.

Those doves that I was watching turn out to be Eurasian Collared Doves, not the Ringed Turtle Doves I was hoping for. Still, it’s kind of neat to have these different looking guys visiting (and I believe nesting) nearby. Here is one in flight.

Has Spring Sprung?

March 20, 2007

Tomorrow is the first day of spring, according to the calendar.

But we don’t need a calendar to tell us spring is almost here. All we need to see are the redbud trees blooming. Driving along highways or residential streets, or looking in one’s own yard, the distinct pink color of the redbud flowers is unmistakable.
.

This young tree was about three feet tall when I moved here in 2000. Three years ago it produced its first blooms, and now, about 15 feet tall, you can see it is covered in blooms. And it just happens to be in the perfect spot in our yard.

Nearby is my little Japanese Garden, there is a hint of spring there, as these miniature irises are sprouting up around the pagoda.

Another indicator of spring, and of the roses that will soon be blooming, is the Lady Banks Rose, which is the earliest rose to bloom, at least in my yard. This one is the yellow variety, and in a couple of weeks I will be posting a picture of the entire plant in bloom, I hope. But for now, there are just a couple of early birds already opening. Here’s a close-up.

If you want to see a big and beautiful Lady Banks Rose go to the Birmingham Botanical Gardens in about 2 weeks. I guess that when mine is blooming, that will be the time to go, and I will let you know.

There are also azaleas beginning to bloom, and dogwoods with little blooms that soon will be full sized, but their pictures will come later.

As you drive through your neighborhoods, look for these early signs of spring. Each day will bring more color, and new life, to our yards and parks. It just makes you want to get outside and dig in the dirt, doesn’t it.

Here is a question for those who live on or near Dartmouth Avenue:

Why can’t the city designate a “truck route” coming from Lipscomb on Dartmouth Avenue, at Carolina Terrace, to Carolina Avenue, all the way to 14th Street or Highway 150?

On this map, where the star is, is the intersection of Carolina Terrace and Dartmouth. (Don’t follow the “brown” line…that was on there when I copied the map).


Doing this would keep those noisy and dangerous trucks off of the residential street Dartmouth Avenue, and send them down the mainly commercial street Carolina. Bus routes would not have to change, and of course emergency vehicles and fire trucks would still use Dartmouth. Earl, are you listening? This is your street.

>Has Spring Sprung?

March 20, 2007

>Tomorrow is the first day of spring, according to the calendar.

But we don’t need a calendar to tell us spring is almost here. All we need to see are the redbud trees blooming. Driving along highways or residential streets, or looking in one’s own yard, the distinct pink color of the redbud flowers is unmistakable.
.

This young tree was about three feet tall when I moved here in 2000. Three years ago it produced its first blooms, and now, about 15 feet tall, you can see it is covered in blooms. And it just happens to be in the perfect spot in our yard.

Nearby is my little Japanese Garden, there is a hint of spring there, as these miniature irises are sprouting up around the pagoda.

Another indicator of spring, and of the roses that will soon be blooming, is the Lady Banks Rose, which is the earliest rose to bloom, at least in my yard. This one is the yellow variety, and in a couple of weeks I will be posting a picture of the entire plant in bloom, I hope. But for now, there are just a couple of early birds already opening. Here’s a close-up.

If you want to see a big and beautiful Lady Banks Rose go to the Birmingham Botanical Gardens in about 2 weeks. I guess that when mine is blooming, that will be the time to go, and I will let you know.

There are also azaleas beginning to bloom, and dogwoods with little blooms that soon will be full sized, but their pictures will come later.

As you drive through your neighborhoods, look for these early signs of spring. Each day will bring more color, and new life, to our yards and parks. It just makes you want to get outside and dig in the dirt, doesn’t it.

Here is a question for those who live on or near Dartmouth Avenue:

Why can’t the city designate a “truck route” coming from Lipscomb on Dartmouth Avenue, at Carolina Terrace, to Carolina Avenue, all the way to 14th Street or Highway 150?

On this map, where the star is, is the intersection of Carolina Terrace and Dartmouth. (Don’t follow the “brown” line…that was on there when I copied the map).


Doing this would keep those noisy and dangerous trucks off of the residential street Dartmouth Avenue, and send them down the mainly commercial street Carolina. Bus routes would not have to change, and of course emergency vehicles and fire trucks would still use Dartmouth. Earl, are you listening? This is your street.