Archive for the ‘Roses’ Category

>Vote tomorrow, and fall bloomers

November 9, 2009

>The protest against Love Won Out was a huge success. Read here what went on inside, and outside the conference. There is hope for the children who were forced to attend.

Be sure to vote tomorrow, for Claire Mitchell for district 56 representative. She’s a champion for education as well as entrepreneurship.


Hurricane Ida is approaching and may affect our weather tomorrow. I took some pictures this morning since these shrubs may not look so good in a day or two.

This rose is still producing blooms, and leaving a pleasant scent on the back porch.

This rose blooms all summer long, with flowers that change color.

This is a fall blooming camellia.

This camellia is usually at it’s peak around Christmas

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>American Pillar

May 9, 2008

>I am not writing about a pillar of society, rather I am promoting a vigorous rambling rose. I believe this rose is American Pillar, introduced in 1902. It is aggressive, growing very rapidly, and when I moved here it was just spread all over the place. I built this “pillar” for it to climb on, but I can’t keep it contained, and it has grown up into an oak tree and over to and along the fence.

But its blooms are a wonderful shade of deep pink with many bright yellow stamens, occuring in bunches. Unfortunately it only blooms once a year, and last year had no blooms as the entire plant was afflicted by powdery mildew.

One thing I like is the timing of its show, because as most of the other old roses are past their peak, this one takes over, and is visible from the street as well as from the yard.


In a different light, the blooms take on a slighly different hue, leading some to think this might be a different variety.
If anyone thinks this might be something other than American Pillar, let me know.

And if anyone needs a good laugh, just watch this clip from “Whose Line is it Anyway” with Richard Simmons. Careful, if you are at work, your co-workers will wonder why you are rolling in the floor.

American Pillar

May 9, 2008

I am not writing about a pillar of society, rather I am promoting a vigorous rambling rose. I believe this rose is American Pillar, introduced in 1902. It is aggressive, growing very rapidly, and when I moved here it was just spread all over the place. I built this “pillar” for it to climb on, but I can’t keep it contained, and it has grown up into an oak tree and over to and along the fence.

But its blooms are a wonderful shade of deep pink with many bright yellow stamens, occuring in bunches. Unfortunately it only blooms once a year, and last year had no blooms as the entire plant was afflicted by powdery mildew.

One thing I like is the timing of its show, because as most of the other old roses are past their peak, this one takes over, and is visible from the street as well as from the yard.


In a different light, the blooms take on a slighly different hue, leading some to think this might be a different variety.
If anyone thinks this might be something other than American Pillar, let me know.

And if anyone needs a good laugh, just watch this clip from “Whose Line is it Anyway” with Richard Simmons. Careful, if you are at work, your co-workers will wonder why you are rolling in the floor.

>The Ever Changing Gardens

May 1, 2008

>For the benefit of those who have not seen our garden, or don’t realize how much it changes from day to day, here’s a look see. This is my second post of the day, so you may be here looking for something about chickens…if so, scroll down. But take a look at the flowers on the way.

This is a Rugosa, old thorny roses that produce really interesting flowers and often have a nice fragrance reminding one of old Victorian gardens.


Peonies are sort of like fragile roses. Their stems don’t want to hold up the heavy blossoms, and rain really gets them.

Over at the pergola one has to look up to see the variety. this is Climbing Clotide Soupert, introduced in 1902, with over 100 petals per blossom and an outstanding fragrance. the blossoms are heavy, so letting it climb gives an opportunity to see them, otherwise they hang and face the ground sometimes.

Directly under the pergola one sees mainly red. I still don’t know the name of this one, though I have been told it might be Will Scarlett.

This area of the garden actually is ruled by this mockingbird, and she was very glad to see the garden return to her rule the other day.

She doesn’t even like me in the area, and often flies at my head. I know she must have a nest nearby, but have not found it yet.

And even higher, growing up through a magnolia tree, is Mermaid, an old climber from 1918, and this one may be that old. The 30 foot canes are huge, and the white blooms with their bright yellow stamens are wonderful, best seen from the bathroom window actually.

Ballerina has been around since 1937, and has a slight musky smell. But what is striking is how the flowers are bunched in hydrangea fashion (technically not so, but only in appearance).


There will be more to come in the following days. If you haven’t seen the garden and want to, now is the time. Give me a call or email.

The Ever Changing Gardens

May 1, 2008

For the benefit of those who have not seen our garden, or don’t realize how much it changes from day to day, here’s a look see. This is my second post of the day, so you may be here looking for something about chickens…if so, scroll down. But take a look at the flowers on the way.

This is a Rugosa, old thorny roses that produce really interesting flowers and often have a nice fragrance reminding one of old Victorian gardens.


Peonies are sort of like fragile roses. Their stems don’t want to hold up the heavy blossoms, and rain really gets them.

Over at the pergola one has to look up to see the variety. this is Climbing Clotide Soupert, introduced in 1902, with over 100 petals per blossom and an outstanding fragrance. the blossoms are heavy, so letting it climb gives an opportunity to see them, otherwise they hang and face the ground sometimes.

Directly under the pergola one sees mainly red. I still don’t know the name of this one, though I have been told it might be Will Scarlett.

This area of the garden actually is ruled by this mockingbird, and she was very glad to see the garden return to her rule the other day.

She doesn’t even like me in the area, and often flies at my head. I know she must have a nest nearby, but have not found it yet.

And even higher, growing up through a magnolia tree, is Mermaid, an old climber from 1918, and this one may be that old. The 30 foot canes are huge, and the white blooms with their bright yellow stamens are wonderful, best seen from the bathroom window actually.

Ballerina has been around since 1937, and has a slight musky smell. But what is striking is how the flowers are bunched in hydrangea fashion (technically not so, but only in appearance).


There will be more to come in the following days. If you haven’t seen the garden and want to, now is the time. Give me a call or email.

>Tell the Whole Story, Dale

May 10, 2007

>I posed the question “Who will be next?” to leave in the Bush administration and now we know: Tony Blair, announcing today that he is stepping down as Prime Minister. I have to admit, I’m not sad to see Bush’s lap dog go.

And in Bessemer, we have someone ready to make a run at replacing Tony Snow as President Bush’s press secretary if such an opportunity arises. Dale Jones, the editor of The Western Star, has once again misrepresented the truth regarding the war in Iraq as to leave no doubt that he could handle the job. Remember early this year he made the assertion that every person who has served would “return to Iraq in a second” while we all know of such veterans who have denounced the war and are working to get us out of Iraq.

This week, in his weekly editorial titled “Our Fight is against Al-Qaeda, not Iraq” Jones once again shows his willingness to twist the truth to fit his message, much as the White House does through its press secretary. He says:

Al-Qaeda was formed in or around 1988, twelve years before Bush went into office.

Ollie North testified before (the) Senate. He told Senator Al Gore that Osama bin Laden, the force behind Al-Qaeda, was the one man that he was most afraid of.

We’ve had opportunities before Bush to make a difference, but our “leaders” seemed too busy dealing with interns in the oval office.

Let’s remember, that twelve years before Bush went into office, when Jones says Al-Qaeda was formed (1988), Ronald Reagan was president (1981 – 1989) and during the next four years while Al-Qaeda was gaining strength, daddy Bush was president. And let’s not forget where Osama bin Laden got his inspiration.


When the marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, were destroyed by a suicide bomber in 1983, killing 241 American servicemen, Reagan was president, and did he retaliate? No. After initially pledging to keep a military force in Lebanon, he quickly changed his plans and withdrew. We did nothing to retaliate. Cutting and running, we were unable to get out of there fast enough. The success of that attack led to a sharp increase in suicide bombings across the world, and such bombings were later adopted by Al-Qaeda as an often used tactic. Bin Laden himself has indicated that the bombing in Beirut and the U. S. unwillingness to respond was inspiration for him.

So don’t blame the Clinton administration for the rise of Al-Qaeda. Jones is right, we have had opportunities before Bush to make a difference, in fact, Al-Qaeda might never have come into existence if Reagan had stood up to the terrorists in 1983. Tell the whole story, Dale.

And some roses.

The fence surrounding the back of our property is covered in vines and shadowed by trees, but as we have begun to clear it off, surprises have been revealed. These roses are two of several that remain, that the former owner must have had covering the fence decades ago. If we can get more sunlight onto the fence area by trimming some scrubby trees back, I’m hoping the roses will flourish once again.

Tell the Whole Story, Dale

May 10, 2007

I posed the question “Who will be next?” to leave in the Bush administration and now we know: Tony Blair, announcing today that he is stepping down as Prime Minister. I have to admit, I’m not sad to see Bush’s lap dog go.

And in Bessemer, we have someone ready to make a run at replacing Tony Snow as President Bush’s press secretary if such an opportunity arises. Dale Jones, the editor of The Western Star, has once again misrepresented the truth regarding the war in Iraq as to leave no doubt that he could handle the job. Remember early this year he made the assertion that every person who has served would “return to Iraq in a second” while we all know of such veterans who have denounced the war and are working to get us out of Iraq.

This week, in his weekly editorial titled “Our Fight is against Al-Qaeda, not Iraq” Jones once again shows his willingness to twist the truth to fit his message, much as the White House does through its press secretary. He says:

Al-Qaeda was formed in or around 1988, twelve years before Bush went into office.

Ollie North testified before (the) Senate. He told Senator Al Gore that Osama bin Laden, the force behind Al-Qaeda, was the one man that he was most afraid of.

We’ve had opportunities before Bush to make a difference, but our “leaders” seemed too busy dealing with interns in the oval office.

Let’s remember, that twelve years before Bush went into office, when Jones says Al-Qaeda was formed (1988), Ronald Reagan was president (1981 – 1989) and during the next four years while Al-Qaeda was gaining strength, daddy Bush was president. And let’s not forget where Osama bin Laden got his inspiration.


When the marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, were destroyed by a suicide bomber in 1983, killing 241 American servicemen, Reagan was president, and did he retaliate? No. After initially pledging to keep a military force in Lebanon, he quickly changed his plans and withdrew. We did nothing to retaliate. Cutting and running, we were unable to get out of there fast enough. The success of that attack led to a sharp increase in suicide bombings across the world, and such bombings were later adopted by Al-Qaeda as an often used tactic. Bin Laden himself has indicated that the bombing in Beirut and the U. S. unwillingness to respond was inspiration for him.

So don’t blame the Clinton administration for the rise of Al-Qaeda. Jones is right, we have had opportunities before Bush to make a difference, in fact, Al-Qaeda might never have come into existence if Reagan had stood up to the terrorists in 1983. Tell the whole story, Dale.

And some roses.

The fence surrounding the back of our property is covered in vines and shadowed by trees, but as we have begun to clear it off, surprises have been revealed. These roses are two of several that remain, that the former owner must have had covering the fence decades ago. If we can get more sunlight onto the fence area by trimming some scrubby trees back, I’m hoping the roses will flourish once again.

>Prisoners Roaming the Streets and Roses and Buntings

May 3, 2007

>So yesterday I leave my house, turning on to Dartmouth Avenue, and am immediately surrounded by prisoners in orange and white striped and solid orange jump suits, on both sides of the road. Meandering along, they seem to be picking up trash. Last summer the men from The Foundry picked up trash along the streets of Bessemer.

Years ago there were complaints when the prisoners were roaming the neighborhoods and I thought the policy had been changed. Does this bother anyone? What presents a better image to people driving through our neighborhood, littered streets with no prisoners or clean streets with prisoners?

You will never, never catch me on a ladder this high, like this painter at the Broken Vessel Church. I need him over here to paint this house.

Yesterday I saw an indigo bunting in the backyard. Ted reports seeing them in Lipscomb, but this is the first one I have seen here. So, here is a fact, from The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds: “Indigo Buntings have no blue pigment; they are actually black, but the diffraction of light through the structure of the feathers makes them appear blue.” They are this bright color in sunlight, but are drab or black looking otherwise. Who else has seen indigo buntings?

You know we have lots of “redbirds” or cardinals around here, and this one little “blue bird.” Sort of like the political climate here, our indigo is a bright blue dot in a red state!

http://britebluedot.com/

Flowers

This is Blaze, so I am told, it blooms all summer

The Green Rose is kind of an oddity, having been around since 1845, the “petals” have reverted back to leaves. Some have speculated that the “stationmasters along the Underground Railroad might have used boutonnieres of the Green Rose as a covert sign to others transporting their perilous cargo northward ” (from 100 Old Roses for the American Garden, Clair G. Martin, Smith & Hawken).


New Dawn claims the distinction of being U. S. Plant Patent No. 1, the first rose patented under federal regulations.

The peonies just don’t last long enough, but wow!

Prisoners Roaming the Streets and Roses and Buntings

May 3, 2007

So yesterday I leave my house, turning on to Dartmouth Avenue, and am immediately surrounded by prisoners in orange and white striped and solid orange jump suits, on both sides of the road. Meandering along, they seem to be picking up trash. Last summer the men from The Foundry picked up trash along the streets of Bessemer.

Years ago there were complaints when the prisoners were roaming the neighborhoods and I thought the policy had been changed. Does this bother anyone? What presents a better image to people driving through our neighborhood, littered streets with no prisoners or clean streets with prisoners?

You will never, never catch me on a ladder this high, like this painter at the Broken Vessel Church. I need him over here to paint this house.

Yesterday I saw an indigo bunting in the backyard. Ted reports seeing them in Lipscomb, but this is the first one I have seen here. So, here is a fact, from The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds: “Indigo Buntings have no blue pigment; they are actually black, but the diffraction of light through the structure of the feathers makes them appear blue.” They are this bright color in sunlight, but are drab or black looking otherwise. Who else has seen indigo buntings?

You know we have lots of “redbirds” or cardinals around here, and this one little “blue bird.” Sort of like the political climate here, our indigo is a bright blue dot in a red state!

http://britebluedot.com/

Flowers

This is Blaze, so I am told, it blooms all summer

The Green Rose is kind of an oddity, having been around since 1845, the “petals” have reverted back to leaves. Some have speculated that the “stationmasters along the Underground Railroad might have used boutonnieres of the Green Rose as a covert sign to others transporting their perilous cargo northward ” (from 100 Old Roses for the American Garden, Clair G. Martin, Smith & Hawken).


New Dawn claims the distinction of being U. S. Plant Patent No. 1, the first rose patented under federal regulations.

The peonies just don’t last long enough, but wow!

>A New Planet and More Roses

April 25, 2007

>

What if this new planet that was discovered did support life? And what if the life was intelligent, on the same par as us? And what if their civilization has developed to a level comparable to ours? Unlike us, maybe theirs is a peaceful civilization, and they have never spoiled their environment or depleted their resources.

Imagine we discover first a way to communicate, and the language barriers are quickly overcome. Advancing technology allows us to plan a visit to their planet, and they say they will welcome us. A huge investment is made to send a party of earthlings to the new planet. Using space warp technology, we arrive after just 6 years in space.

And within 8 earth months, we have introduced disease, war, and a disregard for their environment. Within a year, we have screwed their planet up, and started it on the path to ruin, much as we have done to our own planet. Will there be someone like Al Gore to save their environment? A Jimmy Carter to bring peace back to them? A Bill Clinton to promote solving the medical crisis that has developed? Let’s hope so.

These roses are about 15 to 20 feet off the ground, the one on the left is “Mermaid” growing up through a magnolia tree. A close up is below.

Mermaid, introduced in 1918, grows up to 30 feet as a climber.

This is Celestial, I have been told, although does it really grow as a climber? This one is about 12 feet tall, growing on the pergola. The fragrance is really outstanding, I look forward to this flower every year.

This is the rose I am calling Will Scarlett until someone corrects me, above the pergola.

And this is the “noisette” (I pictured a single bloom a few days ago). It’s blooming up high above the pergola also. Standing (or sitting with a cup of coffee) under the pergola these days one is just immersed in fragrance that is unbelievable. What a way to start your morning!

Too bad storms are coming tonight. We need the rain, but there will be rose petals all over the yard.