Archive for the ‘gay’ Category

>Troy King Day 4

July 12, 2008

>No word from Troy King. Seems strange that he would not make a public statement to deny the rumors, as homophobic as he has proven himself to be. “How could people be saying he is gay, and yet you say he is homophobic,” you ask.

Troy King wrote homophobic articles while a student at the University of Alabama. He has made homophobic statements while attorney general.

I found some of his statements Here:

As a law student at the University of Alabama, King wrote frequent editorials for The Crimson White in condemnation of gays, affirmative action and abortion. In his editorials for the student newspaper, King called homosexuality the ‘downfall of society’ and said AIDS could be cleansed from America if “this nation’s current purveyors of perversion would refrain from committing sodomy.”

King also slammed the idea that gays and lesbians could provide loving, normal families for children, saying: “I often hear the argument that homosexuals who live together create a loving, caring family environment, perhaps an environment which is even superior to that which can be provided by a heterosexual couple. In this day of rampant decadence, many homosexuals would misled society into believe that three men, an armadillo and a house plant create a functional family.”

It is because of blatantly homophobic and untrue statements like those that I have no respect for the man.

Often men whose true desires are for other men, yet for a multitude of reasons feel they must hide those desires, put on the appearance of being virulently anti-gay as a front.

Then there is this: UGA Study .

I have referenced this study before, but basically what is says is that in some men those who go out of their way to exhibit anti-homosexual views are indeed suppressing their own sexuality. The study tells how the authors came to the conclusion, and it makes sense.

Some men who are deeply closeted practice risky behaviors, and some even have a desire to “get caught.”

So, we have the attorney general, who formerly was John McCain’s Alabama campaign chair, but now no longer has that position, at least the reference to such has been removed from the McCain web site, according to Fishbowl America. What does that mean? Is King’s world shrinking?

Why have no Republicans of note said anything about this? *(I don’t consider former lieutenant governors who pee in jugs to be of note, although I heard that Windom said King would not resign).

We are “Inquiring minds” and we want to know.

Here is what a commenter on Thomason Tracts says:

To be honest, I’ve been saying Troy was a closet homosexual for years. But that’s a far cry from being caught by his wife with his young aide.
I’ve always kinda thought Troy was in denial. In a perfect world, where he didn’t grow up hating himself for being gay, he’d be a balanced, open individual. But as it is, he’s a little troll.

By the way, his gayness is based solely on my personal gaydar which hasn’t been calibrated lately.

There are others on numerous other blogs whose gaydar has been set off by King, dating back to his college days and up to the present.

We will continue to follow the story.

Troy King Day 4

July 12, 2008

No word from Troy King. Seems strange that he would not make a public statement to deny the rumors, as homophobic as he has proven himself to be. “How could people be saying he is gay, and yet you say he is homophobic,” you ask.

Troy King wrote homophobic articles while a student at the University of Alabama. He has made homophobic statements while attorney general.

I found some of his statements Here:

As a law student at the University of Alabama, King wrote frequent editorials for The Crimson White in condemnation of gays, affirmative action and abortion. In his editorials for the student newspaper, King called homosexuality the ‘downfall of society’ and said AIDS could be cleansed from America if “this nation’s current purveyors of perversion would refrain from committing sodomy.”

King also slammed the idea that gays and lesbians could provide loving, normal families for children, saying: “I often hear the argument that homosexuals who live together create a loving, caring family environment, perhaps an environment which is even superior to that which can be provided by a heterosexual couple. In this day of rampant decadence, many homosexuals would misled society into believe that three men, an armadillo and a house plant create a functional family.”

It is because of blatantly homophobic and untrue statements like those that I have no respect for the man.

Often men whose true desires are for other men, yet for a multitude of reasons feel they must hide those desires, put on the appearance of being virulently anti-gay as a front.

Then there is this: UGA Study .

I have referenced this study before, but basically what is says is that in some men those who go out of their way to exhibit anti-homosexual views are indeed suppressing their own sexuality. The study tells how the authors came to the conclusion, and it makes sense.

Some men who are deeply closeted practice risky behaviors, and some even have a desire to “get caught.”

So, we have the attorney general, who formerly was John McCain’s Alabama campaign chair, but now no longer has that position, at least the reference to such has been removed from the McCain web site, according to Fishbowl America. What does that mean? Is King’s world shrinking?

Why have no Republicans of note said anything about this? *(I don’t consider former lieutenant governors who pee in jugs to be of note, although I heard that Windom said King would not resign).

We are “Inquiring minds” and we want to know.

Here is what a commenter on Thomason Tracts says:

To be honest, I’ve been saying Troy was a closet homosexual for years. But that’s a far cry from being caught by his wife with his young aide.
I’ve always kinda thought Troy was in denial. In a perfect world, where he didn’t grow up hating himself for being gay, he’d be a balanced, open individual. But as it is, he’s a little troll.

By the way, his gayness is based solely on my personal gaydar which hasn’t been calibrated lately.

There are others on numerous other blogs whose gaydar has been set off by King, dating back to his college days and up to the present.

We will continue to follow the story.

>In and Out of Step With Jesus

April 29, 2008

>The title of an opinion column in the Birmingham News certainly caught my eye this morning. “Modern Christianity out of step with Jesus’ teachings.”

Ok, many of us have recognized this for years. Many of us have been driven away from churches or denominations for this reason. Many of us are appalled at the modern “church’s” influence on society and politics. Many of us have found Jesus’ teachings to be inspirational, along with the teachings of other spiritual leaders, and have learned to use them to guide our lives without the need to be controlled by a man pretending to be God (whether that is what many pastors and priests claim or not).

So this column by Leonard Pitts Jr. was a must read.

Pitts starts out by quoting Rev. Hayes Wicker of (no surprise) First Baptist Church of Naples, Florida, who called same sex marriage a “tremendous social crisis, greater even than the issue of slavery.” Who is more insulted there? American blacks for whom our history is tainted with their sweat and blood, and without whom this country would never have reached the status that it did, or gays whose inequality is championed as being even worse?

Pitts says that remark is in step with much of modern Christianity, and I agree. One does not have to look far to find a preacher demonizing gays; local television one Sunday morning recently had a local church broadcast where a black pastor was sending gays to hell right and left.

Pitts quotes James Lawson, an icon of the civil rights movement, who supports gay rights, “The human rights issue is not a single issue. It is about all humankind. And all humankind has been endowed with certain inalienable rights.” Responding to the Wicker quote, Lawson said “Obviously he does not know anything about 250 years of slavery or the 143 years since slavery as the nation has largely failed to deal with the issue of slavery and its consequences…And he knows even less about the gospel of Jesus.”

I will continue to quote Lawson. “Much of Christianity in the United States has been more influenced by violence and sexism and racism and greed than by the teachings of Jesus.”

Amen.

Pitts closes with “Lawson is out of step with modern Christianity. Thank God someone is.”

OK. But Lawson is not getting the headlines, Jeremiah Wright is. Gee, if we study the teachings of Jesus and begin to apply them to America, we might just realize that Wright’s sermons irritate us not because they are so radically anti-American, but because they expose the truth. America is embarrassed by much of its history (as well it should be) and we have a strong desire to ignore that which pains or embarrasses us.

I for one am glad Rev. Wright has begun to explain his statements. Listen and learn, America.

In and Out of Step With Jesus

April 29, 2008

The title of an opinion column in the Birmingham News certainly caught my eye this morning. “Modern Christianity out of step with Jesus’ teachings.”

Ok, many of us have recognized this for years. Many of us have been driven away from churches or denominations for this reason. Many of us are appalled at the modern “church’s” influence on society and politics. Many of us have found Jesus’ teachings to be inspirational, along with the teachings of other spiritual leaders, and have learned to use them to guide our lives without the need to be controlled by a man pretending to be God (whether that is what many pastors and priests claim or not).

So this column by Leonard Pitts Jr. was a must read.

Pitts starts out by quoting Rev. Hayes Wicker of (no surprise) First Baptist Church of Naples, Florida, who called same sex marriage a “tremendous social crisis, greater even than the issue of slavery.” Who is more insulted there? American blacks for whom our history is tainted with their sweat and blood, and without whom this country would never have reached the status that it did, or gays whose inequality is championed as being even worse?

Pitts says that remark is in step with much of modern Christianity, and I agree. One does not have to look far to find a preacher demonizing gays; local television one Sunday morning recently had a local church broadcast where a black pastor was sending gays to hell right and left.

Pitts quotes James Lawson, an icon of the civil rights movement, who supports gay rights, “The human rights issue is not a single issue. It is about all humankind. And all humankind has been endowed with certain inalienable rights.” Responding to the Wicker quote, Lawson said “Obviously he does not know anything about 250 years of slavery or the 143 years since slavery as the nation has largely failed to deal with the issue of slavery and its consequences…And he knows even less about the gospel of Jesus.”

I will continue to quote Lawson. “Much of Christianity in the United States has been more influenced by violence and sexism and racism and greed than by the teachings of Jesus.”

Amen.

Pitts closes with “Lawson is out of step with modern Christianity. Thank God someone is.”

OK. But Lawson is not getting the headlines, Jeremiah Wright is. Gee, if we study the teachings of Jesus and begin to apply them to America, we might just realize that Wright’s sermons irritate us not because they are so radically anti-American, but because they expose the truth. America is embarrassed by much of its history (as well it should be) and we have a strong desire to ignore that which pains or embarrasses us.

I for one am glad Rev. Wright has begun to explain his statements. Listen and learn, America.

>Cheyenne Jackson

April 3, 2008

>Now I really want to see Xanadu. Cheyenne stars as the leading man… struggling artist Sonny Malone in the Olivia Newton John remembrance. He’s part Native American and 100% handsome. He spoke about his gayness in The Advocate and his story, of coming out to his family at 19, of getting turned on by Popeye and Brutus bondage at 7, and of being in a loving and understanding relationship for 9 years is nothing but sweet and uplifting.

Of course he went through what we all do, whether we come out at 7 or 19 or 40, but of particular merit is the importance that celebrity or well known role models hold for young gay people. One teenager asked for a picture, and later clutched it as he told his parents he was gay “because it gave him strength.” He even loaned the picture to a friend a couple of weeks later when he coming out.

I might even watch the Tony’s this year…well, if he’s nominated.

At least click on the link and read the first of the article. What he says about Popeye will crack you up.

I probably won’t make it to New York to see Xanadu, but I did see this on Thanksgiving Day and did leave the oven unattended for a few minutes:

Here is Cheyenne’s web site Cheyenne Jackson

My other connection (yeah right, like that was one) to Xanadu is:

In Xanadu did Kubla Kahn
A stately pleasure-dome decree :
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground

With walls and towers were girdled round :
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfoldingsunny spots of greenery.

The link takes you to the entire poem. I wrote a term paper in high school about Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s drug use and how it influenced his poetry.

Nice pictures (of flowers and such) are due Friday.

Cheyenne Jackson

April 3, 2008

Now I really want to see Xanadu. Cheyenne stars as the leading man… struggling artist Sonny Malone in the Olivia Newton John remembrance. He’s part Native American and 100% handsome. He spoke about his gayness in The Advocate and his story, of coming out to his family at 19, of getting turned on by Popeye and Brutus bondage at 7, and of being in a loving and understanding relationship for 9 years is nothing but sweet and uplifting.

Of course he went through what we all do, whether we come out at 7 or 19 or 40, but of particular merit is the importance that celebrity or well known role models hold for young gay people. One teenager asked for a picture, and later clutched it as he told his parents he was gay “because it gave him strength.” He even loaned the picture to a friend a couple of weeks later when he coming out.

I might even watch the Tony’s this year…well, if he’s nominated.

At least click on the link and read the first of the article. What he says about Popeye will crack you up.

I probably won’t make it to New York to see Xanadu, but I did see this on Thanksgiving Day and did leave the oven unattended for a few minutes:

Here is Cheyenne’s web site Cheyenne Jackson

My other connection (yeah right, like that was one) to Xanadu is:

In Xanadu did Kubla Kahn
A stately pleasure-dome decree :
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground

With walls and towers were girdled round :
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfoldingsunny spots of greenery.

The link takes you to the entire poem. I wrote a term paper in high school about Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s drug use and how it influenced his poetry.

Nice pictures (of flowers and such) are due Friday.

>Oscars…Gay after all

February 25, 2008

>Back in business. Don’t forget the Bessemer Neighborhood Associaiton meeting tonight at 7:00 at Food World.

This week is midterm week and last week was worse, as far as time was involved, so I was buried in books and meetings, but I can’t resist commenting on the Oscars.

Some gays still aren’t over the loss of Best Picture two years ago when Crash beat out Brokeback Mountain. They feel they were robbed (but hey, can’t that happen anytime votes are cast?..2000?). Personally, I think Brokeback Mountain garnered so much positive hype that not winning the Oscar is not a big deal. Disappointment, yes.

But this is 2008, and a year that there was not expected to be a big gay component to the Oscars (as if the ceremony could take place without a “big gay component”, but I digress). If you stayed up to the end of the show, however, you were not disappointed.

First, though, let me mention my favorite Oscar moments. I always love the surprise and joy exhibited by those who are not expected to win and do. Marion Cotillard, who won best actress for her performance of Edith Piaf in the French language film La Vie En Rose certainly did not disappoint. “…thank you life, thank you love, and it is true, there is some angels in this city. Thank you so, so much.” How can you argue with that for a magic moment, especially her joyful unbelieving walk off stage?

And while we are on the best performer categories (supporting actor), Javier Bardem – No Country For Old Men (who brought his mother to the event), rattled of part of his acceptance speech in Spanish (how long before republicans introduce a bill that award ceremony speeches have to be given in English?). Yes, Bardem is a hunk, and yes he has played gay roles a couple of times (Second Skin, Before Night Falls) and he has answered the “are you gay” question…but Javi…bringing your mother to the Oscars does not help to dispel rumors.

Another favorite moment was Diablo Cody winning for original screenplay for Juno. She had to hold her dress closed because of the slit that might have exposed her um… well, no one was looking because all eyes were focused on the great tat on her arm of a woman in a bikini. And what a character…she drew on her own life for Juno (minus the pregnancy), her first effort at screenwriting.

Oscars three gay moments (oh there were more, I know).

John Stewart’s relaying of backstage humor when two winners wanted their Oscars to kiss and one remarked that they were both men and admitted well this is Hollywood or something to that effect. I don’t have the transcript for this one.

But, not the first time two men have kissed backstage I am sure.

Shortly after that the Short Subject Documentary Freeheld, The Legacy of Laurel Hester, which is about a dying woman’s effort to get her pension awarded to her life partner. Here is part of director Cynthia Wade’s acceptance speech, “Thank you. It was Lieutenant Laurel Hester’s dying wish that her fight for, against discrimination would make a difference for all the same sex couples across the country that face discrimination every day. Discrimination that I don’t face as a married woman…”

Thank you Cynthia, both for telling this story, and for telling over 1 billion people (those watching last night) around the world about discrimination.

Finally, the Oscars ended with the best remark of the gay evening, producer Scott Rudin who along with Joel and Ethan Coen, won best picture for No Country for Old Men. Scott ended his acceptance speech and the evening with this, “This is also for my partner John Barlow. Without you, honey, this would be hardware. Thank you so much. Thank you.”

Being able to thank the one you love and who gives you support, priceless.

Oscars…Gay after all

February 25, 2008

Back in business. Don’t forget the Bessemer Neighborhood Associaiton meeting tonight at 7:00 at Food World.

This week is midterm week and last week was worse, as far as time was involved, so I was buried in books and meetings, but I can’t resist commenting on the Oscars.

Some gays still aren’t over the loss of Best Picture two years ago when Crash beat out Brokeback Mountain. They feel they were robbed (but hey, can’t that happen anytime votes are cast?..2000?). Personally, I think Brokeback Mountain garnered so much positive hype that not winning the Oscar is not a big deal. Disappointment, yes.

But this is 2008, and a year that there was not expected to be a big gay component to the Oscars (as if the ceremony could take place without a “big gay component”, but I digress). If you stayed up to the end of the show, however, you were not disappointed.

First, though, let me mention my favorite Oscar moments. I always love the surprise and joy exhibited by those who are not expected to win and do. Marion Cotillard, who won best actress for her performance of Edith Piaf in the French language film La Vie En Rose certainly did not disappoint. “…thank you life, thank you love, and it is true, there is some angels in this city. Thank you so, so much.” How can you argue with that for a magic moment, especially her joyful unbelieving walk off stage?

And while we are on the best performer categories (supporting actor), Javier Bardem – No Country For Old Men (who brought his mother to the event), rattled of part of his acceptance speech in Spanish (how long before republicans introduce a bill that award ceremony speeches have to be given in English?). Yes, Bardem is a hunk, and yes he has played gay roles a couple of times (Second Skin, Before Night Falls) and he has answered the “are you gay” question…but Javi…bringing your mother to the Oscars does not help to dispel rumors.

Another favorite moment was Diablo Cody winning for original screenplay for Juno. She had to hold her dress closed because of the slit that might have exposed her um… well, no one was looking because all eyes were focused on the great tat on her arm of a woman in a bikini. And what a character…she drew on her own life for Juno (minus the pregnancy), her first effort at screenwriting.

Oscars three gay moments (oh there were more, I know).

John Stewart’s relaying of backstage humor when two winners wanted their Oscars to kiss and one remarked that they were both men and admitted well this is Hollywood or something to that effect. I don’t have the transcript for this one.

But, not the first time two men have kissed backstage I am sure.

Shortly after that the Short Subject Documentary Freeheld, The Legacy of Laurel Hester, which is about a dying woman’s effort to get her pension awarded to her life partner. Here is part of director Cynthia Wade’s acceptance speech, “Thank you. It was Lieutenant Laurel Hester’s dying wish that her fight for, against discrimination would make a difference for all the same sex couples across the country that face discrimination every day. Discrimination that I don’t face as a married woman…”

Thank you Cynthia, both for telling this story, and for telling over 1 billion people (those watching last night) around the world about discrimination.

Finally, the Oscars ended with the best remark of the gay evening, producer Scott Rudin who along with Joel and Ethan Coen, won best picture for No Country for Old Men. Scott ended his acceptance speech and the evening with this, “This is also for my partner John Barlow. Without you, honey, this would be hardware. Thank you so much. Thank you.”

Being able to thank the one you love and who gives you support, priceless.

An Alabama Quiz and Birmingham on "The Edge"

January 8, 2008

Gary left link in a comment yesterday to this site. Talk about the future of transportation! Thanks, Gary. I don’t see any problems with a system like this, other than the transition from the current system. That is addressed on the web site, however.

And Kathy at Birmingham Blues had an interesting link to an article in The Edge about Birmingham and its progress in the gay community by Cody Lyon. Here is a quote:

“There is a large, visible, albeit loosely organized gay community in Alabama’s largest city. There are 24-hour gay bars, social, religious and political organizations, annual events, even entire neighborhoods that gays have transformed into friendly enclaves.

In fact, according to the 2000 United State Census, the city of Birmingham was home to a higher per capita concentration of same-sex couples than cities of comparable or larger sizes like Memphis, Charlotte and even more liberal northern cities like Columbus, Ohio.”

The article is a couple of pages long and worth reading if you are interested in Birmingham’s progress. Progress is progress, so you should all be interested.

Cody is from Wilsonville, Alabama and now lives in New York as a writer and such.

OK here is a quiz from the Hartselle Enquirer. Test your knowledge of Alabama. Answers on tomorrow. I scored a lowly 12 out of 30.

1. When was Alabama’s great seal adopted?
2. What does Alabama’s flag look like?
3. What is our state bird?
4. What is our state song?
5. What is our state motto?
6. What is our state tree?
7. What is our state amphibian?
8. What is our state fruit?
9. What is our state spirit (liquor)?
10. What is our state mammal?
11. What is our state tree fruit?
12. What is our state saltwater fish?
13. What is our state flower?
14. What is our state mineral?
15. What is our state rock?
16. What is our state horse?
17. What is our state saltwater fish?
18. What is our state game bird?
19. What is our official American Folk Dance?
20. What is our state nut? (Clue, it is not Roy Moore)
21. What is our state fossil?
22. What is our official mascot?
23. What is our official state butterfly?
24. What is our state reptile?
25. What is our state gemstone?
26. What is our state shell?
27. What is our official State Barbecue Championship?
28. What is our official Horseshoe Tournament?
29. What is our official State Historic Theater?
30. What is our offical State Quilt?

>An Alabama Quiz and Birmingham on "The Edge"

January 8, 2008

>Gary left link in a comment yesterday to this site. Talk about the future of transportation! Thanks, Gary. I don’t see any problems with a system like this, other than the transition from the current system. That is addressed on the web site, however.

And Kathy at Birmingham Blues had an interesting link to an article in The Edge about Birmingham and its progress in the gay community by Cody Lyon. Here is a quote:

“There is a large, visible, albeit loosely organized gay community in Alabama’s largest city. There are 24-hour gay bars, social, religious and political organizations, annual events, even entire neighborhoods that gays have transformed into friendly enclaves.

In fact, according to the 2000 United State Census, the city of Birmingham was home to a higher per capita concentration of same-sex couples than cities of comparable or larger sizes like Memphis, Charlotte and even more liberal northern cities like Columbus, Ohio.”

The article is a couple of pages long and worth reading if you are interested in Birmingham’s progress. Progress is progress, so you should all be interested.

Cody is from Wilsonville, Alabama and now lives in New York as a writer and such.

OK here is a quiz from the Hartselle Enquirer. Test your knowledge of Alabama. Answers on tomorrow. I scored a lowly 12 out of 30.

1. When was Alabama’s great seal adopted?
2. What does Alabama’s flag look like?
3. What is our state bird?
4. What is our state song?
5. What is our state motto?
6. What is our state tree?
7. What is our state amphibian?
8. What is our state fruit?
9. What is our state spirit (liquor)?
10. What is our state mammal?
11. What is our state tree fruit?
12. What is our state saltwater fish?
13. What is our state flower?
14. What is our state mineral?
15. What is our state rock?
16. What is our state horse?
17. What is our state saltwater fish?
18. What is our state game bird?
19. What is our official American Folk Dance?
20. What is our state nut? (Clue, it is not Roy Moore)
21. What is our state fossil?
22. What is our official mascot?
23. What is our official state butterfly?
24. What is our state reptile?
25. What is our state gemstone?
26. What is our state shell?
27. What is our official State Barbecue Championship?
28. What is our official Horseshoe Tournament?
29. What is our official State Historic Theater?
30. What is our offical State Quilt?