Archive for the ‘gay’ Category

>Creation Museum antics

February 14, 2011

>Not long ago I posted a Facebook status about “science” textbook I had come across that mentioned the earth being about 4000 years old.

There is nothing remotely related to science in that belief.

But I was going to let it pass, with hopes that the Mennonite children that might read it would become better educated later in life. I realize that I have no control and no voice in what a private religious organizations teaches its kids.

In and around that time I was involved in a discussion about the replica of Noah’s ark being built. This is being done at the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky. This is to be a full scale replica, big enough to carry specimens of every species, including extinct dinosaurs, I presume, since they believe dinosaurs roamed along with Fred Flintstone and every Australopithecus species and other early human examples.

Photo from exhibit in Creation Museum

I’m not really writing about how ludicrous it is to think that one man could (or would) capture every microscopic species on the earth, and every species of disease carrying mosquito and every species of bedbug and keep those living, even though they might require different environments and micro-climates to sustain them. Remember, some parasites require multiple hosts to complete their life cycle, and for Noah to understand this and be able work out the logistics is just not believable.

No, I am writing about an event the Creation Museum sponsored, a “Date Night” where loving couples were supposed to have a $71 a person dinner and a lecture about what makes a relationship work.

But a gay couple was denied admittance.

They explained to us that the Creation Museum Date Night was a “Christian environment”, therefore the presence of two men eating dinner together would not be allowed. The very sight of this would “add an un-Christian element to the event” and “disrupt the evening for everyone”

.

I assume the organizers of the event have never seen the famous picture of Jesus and his 12 disciples eating together, but I digress.

The gay couple’s tickets were actually purchased by a straight couple. Here is the straight guy’s account of the evening.

Let me just comment that my relationship with my partner is as strong as any straight couple’s relationship that I know, and we can do without the ramblings of any prejudiced instructor on how to make it better.

But still, the gay couple should have been allowed to attend with their straight friends, it seems.

Notice in this photo of an exhibit from the museum that Adam was created as a totally (hot) white guy from that time long ago, the 1960’s.

Maybe he was just ahead of his time…a foretelling of a future Republican congressman wanting to post his profile on Craig’s list.

OK, I’m getting off subject and the Grammy’s just came on so I’ll stop there.

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>A confused gay republican

February 13, 2011

>I’ve never understood gay Republicans. Actually, I’ve never understood Republicans, but let’s stick to the gays.

GOProud is a group of Gay conservatives that have split the CPAC group wide open, and for that I commend them.

But they seem to be self loathing, or hypocritical, or something, as one of their members revealed at CPAC this weekend.

Matt Hissey, in an interview with Ebone Bell of Metro Weekly (at 1:39 in the video):

“I don’t really like gay people that much. Gay people frustrate me, the stereotypical gay people, it frustrates me…someone who puts on a total act. I understand that some guys are feminine, which is fine. But some guys, at some point, are normal, straight-acting, whatever and the next minute they’re jumping up and down. It just frustrates me. The whole conservative thing is just be yourself, be an individual and just don’t be someone you’re not. If someone does or does not accept you, that’s fine but don’t change who you are to look different to others.”

A quick question, are you being yourself Matt when you highlight your hair like that, are you changing who you are to look different to others?

Now, let’s dig a little deeper.

“Some guys…are normal, straight-acting, whatever and the next minute they’re jumping up and down….

So, he wants people to “be individual and just don’t be someone you’re not,” but he wants them to act straight (whatever that means) while being yourself.

So is it OK for straight guys to jump up and down? He says, speaking of his fellow gays “But some guys, at some point, are normal, straight-acting, whatever and the next minute they’re jumping up and down.”

These are straight Green Bay Packer fans. Acting straight one minute, jumping up and down the next.

I don’t know. Again, I can understand being conservative. I might disagree with their policies, but I understand that some people have conservative beliefs.

But to be gay, and support the party that wants to keep you from joining the military, keep you from legalizing your relationships, and wants you to be subject to discrimination in housing and employment, just does not make sense.

>Put it to rest

January 21, 2011

>Let’s put it to rest.

It’s not a choice.

Like Peter said,

While I don’t advertise being gay, I never steer away from an opportunity to educate the straight world that gay is who we are and it’s OK. That it’s the way God created us, and that they can either get over it – or spend their lives fuming about it. That is the only choice in the matter!

Many of you have seen my entry on Born This Way, a web site where ordinary people submit pictures depicting early signs that they were gay.

The site is full of mostly happy stories by mostly adults remembering mostly joyful times of their mostly innocent childhoods.

But then there are some that just make you think. The pictures don’t always tell the whole story.

Here’s John, age 5.

Somewhat typical of many of the photos, John’s pose is certainly suggestive of a fabulousness that many gay kids exhibit at an early age.

But John goes on to explain that this photo was taken “before the taunting, before the indoctrination, before the forced sports, before the shame, before the Southern and the gothic.”

And, John says the boy in the photo is clearly being himself, but that he “doesn’t remember him,” but takes “great joy in knowing that somewhere inside me is the boy in this photo.”

Now, would a 5 year old boy “choose” to steer himself into situations that elicit taunting and shame?

Or take Matt, another southern boy, at age 6.


Matt joined the Cub Scouts that year. If I remember Cub Scouts correctly, it was about teaching boys the traits that make them into honorable men. Traits like honesty, and being truthful.

Matt was just being honest when he shared his dream of what he would be when he grew up at a scout meeting where they were all sitting around telling what they wanted to be (firemen, astronauts, bee farmers, or the Incredible Hulk).

He was just being truthful and honest when his turn came around.

When it came to me I honestly told the room: ‘My husband is going to be a policeman, and I’ll be living in a 3-bedroom house, with flowers and a beagle – and I’ll make the best ice cream in the world.’

My suspicion about not fitting in was solidified at that moment.

Everyone got upset, and the Scout Master started yelling at me – ‘You can’t do that! You’re an abomination, a heathen!’ – and my personal favorite – ‘Devil Child!’ (you know the drill).

The Scout Master then made me sit outside on the front steps of the church by myself, while they finished their meeting. As night crept in, I remember feeling so lonely and afraid. I must have been out there for a couple hours by the time the meeting ended.

When all the laughing kids came spilling out of the church and into their parents’ cars, I asked the Scout Master about calling my mom to let her know the meeting had ended. And he loudly declared ‘Oh, I KNOW whoever put you up to this is coming to get you!’ Then he left me alone, at night, sitting in front of this locked church, in the dark. I had to get the janitor that came later, to call my mom.

So I guess all that talk of being honest and telling the truth…well maybe they were just trying to prepare him for Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. I mean, under that policy service members were expected to lie about who they are. Cub Scouts (and Boy Scouts) are expected to do the same, I guess.

And I don’t think Matt would “choose” to continue on with being gay after this ridicule (and after what happened when his mom picked him up…click on his link and read).

Here is my little story on Born this Way. Nothing quite that dramatic.

Click on Born this Way and read a few of the stories. And then try to justify saying that being gay, or lesbian, or bisexual or transgender is a choice. You can’t do it. Because it is not.

>Presidential Biographies

January 23, 2009

>At the White House site there is a slide show of the 44 presidents with brief biographies of each.

I was looking through the pictures, noticing things like when the first photos were taken, wondering why some of the paintings (or photos of paintings) are in black and white, wondering why they don’t mention that James Buchanan, the 15th President, was gay.


What? Yes, gay. And it seemed pretty out in the open at the time.

In this book, Lies Across America, James Loewen disputes several things that we are taught in school, or brings up things that are true, but that are ignored.

One thing Loewen reveals is that at Wheaton, the historical home of President James Buchanan, his sexuality is denied. Buchanan was gay, and was partnered with Alabama Senator Rufus King for years. Read about it here . That link came from this post on Birmingham Blues about Tom Parker.

King was referred to as “Miss Nancy” and “Aunt Fancy.” I can see that. Check him out.

While there are other writings that suggest Buchanan was gay, I like these snippets from the book.

When King was leaving for France in 1844 after being appointed Minister, he wrote to Buchanan,”I am selfish enough to hope that you will not be able to procure an associate who will cause you to feel no regret at our separation.”

And then Buchanan wrote to a Mrs. Roosevelt, “I am now ‘solitary and alone’, having no companion in the house with me. I have gone a wooing to several gentlemen, but have not succeeded with any one of them. I feel that it is not good for man to be alone; and should not be astonished to find myself married to some old maid who can nurse me when I am sick, provide good dinners for me when I am well, and not expect from me any very ardent or romantic affection.”

Of course the concept of “gay” or having different sexual orientations was not known at the time, and there were no organized anti-gay groups to rally against them. The D. C. elite seemed to take it in stride, using such terms as “better half” and “his wife” in referring to King in relation to Buchanan.

And Buchanan had other things to worry about as president. He certainly left a mess for his successor, Abraham Lincoln, (who, we now know, was bisexual) to deal with.

>A Gift from God

January 8, 2009

>Be sure and read my column about Marley and Me from The Western Tribune, which follows this post.

This is how I have felt since coming out. It was a spiritual experience for me. From time to time I have tried to convey this through my writings. But there it was on Oprah! , as part of her Best Life Series…yesterday.

Sedrick, the guy they are speaking with, is from rural Alabama, although he lives in Georgia now. Reverend Ed Bacon from All Saints Episcopal in Pasadena, and Reverend Michael Beckwith (author of Spiritual Liberation) explain it. Sedrick gets it. Oprah is getting it. There is nothing more I need to say.

>When Gold and Gay Go Together

August 24, 2008

>NBC, along with most of the rest of the media, provides glimpses of the families (Michael Phelps) of athletes, the soap opera romances (swimmers Federica Pellegrini of Italy and Laure Manaudou of France and their love triangle with Italy’s Luca Martin), love interests (Sanya Richards and her fiancee). They even focused on the lost (and found) wedding ring of Kerri Walsh.

Then along comes the biggest story in diving, where the Chinese aspired to and were expected to go 8 for 8. The divers and the press were not expecting China’s Zhoe Luxin to flub his final dive, nor Australia’s Matthew Mitcham to score perfect 10’s on his final dive to overtake the favorite and win gold in the 10 m platform.

Photo from yahoosports

While NBC announcers seemed in awe at Mitcham’s accomplishment, they completely ignored that he is the only out gay male competitor in the Olympics, they ignored his partner sitting in the stands cheering him on, and they ignored the problems Mitcham had in getting his partner to Beijing.*

Some will say it is not the story, the athletic accomplishment is the story. But because the stereotype of gay men does not involve athletics (although the fantasies of gay men might…but that is a different story), and he breaks that stereotype, it is a story. A big one.

So Matthew, even though you said (in an article in The Advocate), “I just want to be known as the Australian diver who did really well at the Olympics,” and I am sure that the people of Australia are thrilled at your capture of the gold medal, for gay people all over the world you an icon.

Why? You also said “It’s everybody else who thinks it’s special when homosexuality and elite sports go together.” You are right. We do. Thanks for providing.

Here is Matthew, his mom and his partner after the win. Watch and hear how describes the win.

Matthew’s partner Lachlan was able to travel to Beijing courtesy of a $5,000 travel grant from Johnson and Johnson’s Athlete Family Support Program. His mom got there because Sydney gay men and lesbians offered to cover her expenses, according to the Advocate article linked above.

>Troy King Rumors in the Tuscaloosa News

August 12, 2008

>Finally, the Troy King (troiking) story has been picked up by some main stream media.

After rumors about John Edwards affair hit the news, now answers are being sought about Troy King’s . Tuscaloosanews.com has a piece.

This article posted on The Huffington Post (which has led to a lot of visits to Bessemer Opinions, thanks to a link in the story. Thanks, HP), invited people to seek out the skeletons in Republican’s closets, and started the ball rolling again.

The Tuscaloosa paper urges a middle ground, reporting without getting sleazy. Hard to do when the subjects are sleazy, but their point I believe is finding ways to address rumors without sitting on them for years, as in the Edwards case.

King sure isn’t going to do it. Afterall, this and this should have been enough to make him want to address the rumors.

So now we just need to see the biggie papers in the state pick it up and demand some answers.

>Steve and Leah…and Dale

August 8, 2008

>I sometimes listen to the Steve and Leah in the Morning show on WERC 960 AM if I am driving during their hours. Today I was fortunate enough to catch the show when Dale Jones, Editor of the Western Star was sub-hosting for Steve, who is stressed out by moving and taking the day off. Sorry Steve, but that is what they said.

I sometimes agree with Steve and Leah, but not often. And the show can be interesting, for instance, a few days ago they were discussing T. Boone Picken’s energy plan, and Leah has a connection that surprised Steve. (She had dated someone who is key in his organization).

But today I had an appointment in Homewood, and when I came out around 10:00 I turned the radio on and a Toby Keith song was playing.

When the song ended they talked about Toby’s upcoming movie, and although they didn’t mention the name, one of them said something about “horses” so I assume “Beer for my Horses” is the movie they were talking about. Dale chimed in “He’s going to be naked,” in a voice expressing anticipation. I mean, like 12 year old boy anticipating seeing the high school senior prom queen next door through the blinds or something.

Leah seemed offended, “No one wants to see that,” she said. “Not me,” from news anchor Neal Vickers. Dale just said he was just reporting what he heard, but did not do anything to hide the excitement that was clearly evident.

Well that is what I am doing here. Just reporting what I heard. But it is always interesting when those who express hatred and homophobia regarding gay folks highlight their hypocrisy in this way.

>Episcopals at Lambeth

July 14, 2008

>Anglicans, including American Episcopals are gathering in Canterbury for the Lambeth Conference which begins in a couple of days.

In this photo and caption from Episcopal News Service, Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul, primate of the Episcopal Church of the Sudan, joins Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in procession before the 10:30 a.m. Eucharist at Salisbury Cathedral July 13.

They are at Salisbury’s Cathedral Church of St. Mary , consecrated in 1258, which boasts the world’s tallest medieval spire, in the southern English county of Wiltshire. Wow, a 750 year old church.

Jefferts Schori, in an interview with Episcopal News Service, said earlier about the conference:

ENS: What message do you plan to bring to the Lambeth Conference?

KJS: That the mission of God is far larger than anything we disagree about.

She may have been thinking that when she said last week that she would explain the actions of the American Church, specifically, regarding Gene Robinson, the gay Bishop from New Hampshire.

In another interview last week, she said,“Some people think that you can read the Bible without understanding the original context and simply take literally what you read. We will interpret – and it’s an important part of faithful living. To assume there is only one way of reading is hubris.”

Anyone who reads this blog will realize that I share the Presiding Bishop’s feelings precisely. And, I am not even Episcopal! But I have followed the denomination and its bold moves to be inclusive closely.

Robinson was not invited to the conference, and he is OK with that. But he is in town, attending and speaking at events nearby. At St. Mary’s Church, Putney, ( another St. Mary’s) he preached yesterday in the face of protesters:

Listed in the church bulletin as a “quiet and reflective” service, it was noisier than usual, with a couple of dozen journalists, television camera operators and a packed church in attendance. Two demonstrators were also present, one carrying a placard outside the church and handing out leaflets saying the Bible prohibits homosexuality and one attempting in the church to shout down Robinson as he began his sermon.

Shouting “Repent! Repent!” the demonstrator was eventually drowned out by the congregation, which rose and sang — with organ accompaniment — the hymn “Thine be the glory, risen, conquering son.” He was escorted out by ushers.

“Pray for that man,” resumed Robinson, his voice shaking slightly. “Fear is a terrible thing. How sad that the Anglican Communion would threaten to tear itself apart over two men or two women who choose to make a Christian family together.”

Noting that several times in the New Testament, the words “be not afraid” and “fear not” appear, Robinson said “the Anglican Communion is going to be fine. Will it change? Probably. Is it going to be easy? Probably not.”

Here is a link to The Gene Pool the entire sermon, which is much more than the protest that you will witness. h/t to JaninSanFran for this.

Google led me to an article about a rugby player titled Robinson on the edge and I believe that description fits Gene Robinson both literally and figuratively. Not invited to the conference, but invited to and attending and preaching at events surrounding the venue, “Robinson on the edge” represents gays who have been on the edge for all of history.

Some would push the gays over the edge, others would reach out and pull them into the fold.

Read this, from the 365 widget to the left, and see how Robinson may be on the edge, but his reach will be inside the conference in a big way.

It will be interesting to follow the Conference, but like both Jefferts Schori and Robinson, I don’t expect any the debate to end at Lambeth.

Episcopals at Lambeth

July 14, 2008

Anglicans, including American Episcopals are gathering in Canterbury for the Lambeth Conference which begins in a couple of days.

In this photo and caption from Episcopal News Service, Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul, primate of the Episcopal Church of the Sudan, joins Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in procession before the 10:30 a.m. Eucharist at Salisbury Cathedral July 13.

They are at Salisbury’s Cathedral Church of St. Mary , consecrated in 1258, which boasts the world’s tallest medieval spire, in the southern English county of Wiltshire. Wow, a 750 year old church.

Jefferts Schori, in an interview with Episcopal News Service, said earlier about the conference:

ENS: What message do you plan to bring to the Lambeth Conference?

KJS: That the mission of God is far larger than anything we disagree about.

She may have been thinking that when she said last week that she would explain the actions of the American Church, specifically, regarding Gene Robinson, the gay Bishop from New Hampshire.

In another interview last week, she said,“Some people think that you can read the Bible without understanding the original context and simply take literally what you read. We will interpret – and it’s an important part of faithful living. To assume there is only one way of reading is hubris.”

Anyone who reads this blog will realize that I share the Presiding Bishop’s feelings precisely. And, I am not even Episcopal! But I have followed the denomination and its bold moves to be inclusive closely.

Robinson was not invited to the conference, and he is OK with that. But he is in town, attending and speaking at events nearby. At St. Mary’s Church, Putney, ( another St. Mary’s) he preached yesterday in the face of protesters:

Listed in the church bulletin as a “quiet and reflective” service, it was noisier than usual, with a couple of dozen journalists, television camera operators and a packed church in attendance. Two demonstrators were also present, one carrying a placard outside the church and handing out leaflets saying the Bible prohibits homosexuality and one attempting in the church to shout down Robinson as he began his sermon.

Shouting “Repent! Repent!” the demonstrator was eventually drowned out by the congregation, which rose and sang — with organ accompaniment — the hymn “Thine be the glory, risen, conquering son.” He was escorted out by ushers.

“Pray for that man,” resumed Robinson, his voice shaking slightly. “Fear is a terrible thing. How sad that the Anglican Communion would threaten to tear itself apart over two men or two women who choose to make a Christian family together.”

Noting that several times in the New Testament, the words “be not afraid” and “fear not” appear, Robinson said “the Anglican Communion is going to be fine. Will it change? Probably. Is it going to be easy? Probably not.”

Here is a link to The Gene Pool the entire sermon, which is much more than the protest that you will witness. h/t to JaninSanFran for this.

Google led me to an article about a rugby player titled Robinson on the edge and I believe that description fits Gene Robinson both literally and figuratively. Not invited to the conference, but invited to and attending and preaching at events surrounding the venue, “Robinson on the edge” represents gays who have been on the edge for all of history.

Some would push the gays over the edge, others would reach out and pull them into the fold.

Read this, from the 365 widget to the left, and see how Robinson may be on the edge, but his reach will be inside the conference in a big way.

It will be interesting to follow the Conference, but like both Jefferts Schori and Robinson, I don’t expect any the debate to end at Lambeth.