Archive for the ‘Episcopal Church’ Category

>An interesting church

February 25, 2011

>While in Charleston, South Carolina I became interested in St. Michael’s Church, which is the oldest church edifice in the City of Charleston. It stands on the site of the first Anglican Church built south of Virginia.

My interest in the church was generated by a cookbook at an aunt’s house. The book is called Faithfully Charleston and has some interesting recipes but also some bits of information about the church, including this description of an epitaph from the graveyard:

Another tells of the mother of nine children, who died, “age 17 years and 27 days.”

Do the math.

Anyway, we went to the church the next day so I could purchase a cookbook.

Later during the day we returned and walked through the sanctuary.

Look at this pulpit in the middle of the room.

From the church information flyer:

The pulpit is the original one, remarkable for its height and the massive sounding board supported by two Corinthian columns. Its prominence bears out the fact that at the time the church was built, the center of interest in the service was the sermon, conflicting with the central place planned for the altar…Although the present reading desk was given in 1892 as a memorial, it is in the location of the original desk, and together with the pulpit above it makes up what is called a “double-decker.”

Here is the Tiffany chancel decoration. The window was installed in 1893, and shows St. Michael casting out the dragon.

Here is the organ, originally installed in 1768, but altered several times and restored in 1994.

Something didn’t feel right as I walked through the church.

I later learned that the Diocese of South Carolina is in a “battle” (their word, not mine) with the leadership of the Episcopal Church, over the acceptance by the church of homosexuals, and in particular the ordination and consecration of a partnered lesbian as bishop suffragan of the diocese of Los Angeles.

Bishop Mark Lawrence has said that he and Episcopal Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori “stand looking at one another across a wide, deep and seemingly unbridgeable theological and canonical chasm.”

He has declared the diocese sovereign within the church.

Shades of South Carolina’s secession from the Union. And (as a distraction), now a South Carolina lawmaker wants the state to issue its own currency. What is going on with the people of that state?

The Diocese has not split from the Episcopal Church as of yet. I hope they realize that the conservatives in this situation are the ones causing the divide…they are the ones breaking away.

Anyway, for those Episcopalians who don’t believe that God makes mistakes and want an inclusive and welcoming church in South Carolina, there are several on this list of welcoming churches, including St. Marks in Charleston.

From their web site:

We welcome all Christians to full participation in the St. Mark’s Parish family without regard to gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, race, or cultural heritage.

Back to the cookbook

Onion Pie, John’s Island Tomato Pie, and St. Michael’s Staff Party Chicken are a few of the recipes that caught my eye, and will be among the first to try. And when I feel like baking, I’ll try my hand at The Lady Irene Charleston Cake.

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>Net Loss – 60

May 29, 2009

>The Episcopal Church has ousted 61 priests that severed their ties and aligned with the Anglican archdiocese of Argentina over gay issues.

Jerry Lamb, the new Episcopal Bishop of San Joaquin, called the decision to oust the clergy “heartbreaking.”

“But, the fact is, they chose to abandon their relationship with the Episcopal Church,” he said.

That is offset a little bit by the gain of Father Cutie (appropriately named, but pronounced KOO’-tee-ay), the priest that jumped ship from the Catholics after being photographed frolicking on the beach with a female cutie, and became an Episcopal priest (he must complete a little more training).

AP Photo

“I believe that I’ve fallen in love and I believe that I’ve struggled with that, between my love for God, and my love for the Church and my love for service,” Cutie said.

And from another source:

He quoted from the book of Psalms and said, “More than ever, I’m assured that God is love.”
He continued, “I have searched my soul and sought God’s guidance for a long time.”

I wonder if he believes that since “God is love” that all love comes from God?

Episcopal Church getting busy

September 10, 2007

All who live in Bessemer should attend the Bessemer Neighborhood Association meeting tonight at 7:00 at Broken Vessel Church on Dartmouth Avenue. There is great concern about City Council action (or inaction) that may lead to a water rate increase and this issue will be discussed. We need more citizens to become involved and to be outspoken about issues like this if we are going to be successful in making Bessemer a better place to live, so come on out.

Contentious Times in Episcopal Land

The local Episcopalians will soon elect a new suffragan, which is a little like an assistant bishop. The six candidates were all together last week in Birmingham meeting Episcopalians from across the state.

The way the church works this is not a popularity contest, but rather “the focus is discernment of what God is calling the diocese (of Alabama) to do.”

I am thinking that God wants the diocese to elect Rev. Marc Burnette, the rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Birmingham to the position. Based primarily on Burnette’s comments from Sunday’s Birmingham News, Burnette seems to realize that God’s “people” includes all people and wants to work toward keeping the church united, but also admits that “if they need to leave, they need to be free to do what they need to do,” referring to the faction threatening to split off over the full inclusion of gays.

It may well be that all 6 of the candidates feel the same way, but Burnette was the most quoted, with comments in 6 paragraphs. All 6 candidates were together, so I am not sure if he might have just been the most outspoken, or why he got so much press, but I am thinking it means he is the leading candidate.

Here’s his long quote. “It’s painful. We are family. We are determined to keep that posture. The desire is not for separation. The U. S. Episcopal Church action is very difficult to understand for some people. There is a sense of carrying out the call to be in fellowship with all God’s people, to genuinely be inclusive. Jesus taught radical inclusivity. The fact is, some people don’t want to stay together. Jesus is about table fellowship. Nobody’s turned away. The church has always been that way. That is church. That’s Jesus in action. If we teach that, then we’re being faithful with Jesus. We hold a space for everyone. If they need to leave, they have to be free to do what they need to do. The Episcopal Church is here for the long haul.”

He also said “My position is I believe in communion. I want the communion to be healthy and whole. I’m for inclusion of all God’s people. Those two are harmonious positions for me.”

The other candidates are Rev. Robert Childers of Grace Episcopal in Anniston, Rev. Alicia Schuster-Weltner, canon for congregational development from the Diocese of Atlanta, Rev. John McKee Sloan of St. Thomas Church in Huntsville, Rev. Pat Wingo of St. Thomas Church in Birmingham, and Rev. William Waldo of Trinity church in Excelsior, Minn.

The Diocese of Alabama will elect its suffragan bishop on September 30. The new official will be consecrated and take office on January 12.

>Episcopal Church getting busy

September 10, 2007

>All who live in Bessemer should attend the Bessemer Neighborhood Association meeting tonight at 7:00 at Broken Vessel Church on Dartmouth Avenue. There is great concern about City Council action (or inaction) that may lead to a water rate increase and this issue will be discussed. We need more citizens to become involved and to be outspoken about issues like this if we are going to be successful in making Bessemer a better place to live, so come on out.

Contentious Times in Episcopal Land

The local Episcopalians will soon elect a new suffragan, which is a little like an assistant bishop. The six candidates were all together last week in Birmingham meeting Episcopalians from across the state.

The way the church works this is not a popularity contest, but rather “the focus is discernment of what God is calling the diocese (of Alabama) to do.”

I am thinking that God wants the diocese to elect Rev. Marc Burnette, the rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Birmingham to the position. Based primarily on Burnette’s comments from Sunday’s Birmingham News, Burnette seems to realize that God’s “people” includes all people and wants to work toward keeping the church united, but also admits that “if they need to leave, they need to be free to do what they need to do,” referring to the faction threatening to split off over the full inclusion of gays.

It may well be that all 6 of the candidates feel the same way, but Burnette was the most quoted, with comments in 6 paragraphs. All 6 candidates were together, so I am not sure if he might have just been the most outspoken, or why he got so much press, but I am thinking it means he is the leading candidate.

Here’s his long quote. “It’s painful. We are family. We are determined to keep that posture. The desire is not for separation. The U. S. Episcopal Church action is very difficult to understand for some people. There is a sense of carrying out the call to be in fellowship with all God’s people, to genuinely be inclusive. Jesus taught radical inclusivity. The fact is, some people don’t want to stay together. Jesus is about table fellowship. Nobody’s turned away. The church has always been that way. That is church. That’s Jesus in action. If we teach that, then we’re being faithful with Jesus. We hold a space for everyone. If they need to leave, they have to be free to do what they need to do. The Episcopal Church is here for the long haul.”

He also said “My position is I believe in communion. I want the communion to be healthy and whole. I’m for inclusion of all God’s people. Those two are harmonious positions for me.”

The other candidates are Rev. Robert Childers of Grace Episcopal in Anniston, Rev. Alicia Schuster-Weltner, canon for congregational development from the Diocese of Atlanta, Rev. John McKee Sloan of St. Thomas Church in Huntsville, Rev. Pat Wingo of St. Thomas Church in Birmingham, and Rev. William Waldo of Trinity church in Excelsior, Minn.

The Diocese of Alabama will elect its suffragan bishop on September 30. The new official will be consecrated and take office on January 12.