Archive for the ‘Breast Cancer’ Category

Let’s Ask, and Tell; and The Race for the Cure

October 12, 2007

If I had known it just took a little publicity to run the litterbugs out, I would have done this long ago. But not one empty bottle or chicken box was tossed out here since my post yesterday. But the reality is…it’s cold and their windows were just rolled up. Auntie Litter, I’ve said it before, and I will say it again…we need you here.

From the “something’s not right” category…from 2003 through 2006 the military allowed 4,230 convicted felons to enlist under the “moral waivers” program.

Total waivers, inlcuding serious misdemeanors along with felonies, for 2006 were 8,129, and for the three years over 125,000 such waivers were granted.

But be a law abiding gay or lesbian seeking to enroll, and you will be denied. The Human Rights Campaign Legacy of Service Tour is hoping to change that. Former marine staff sergeant Eric Alva (the first U. S. serviceman wounded in Iraq) and others are telling their stories. Just one more date is currently on the schedule, in Dallas, but I am sure others will be added. We need to drop “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and allow everyone who wants to put their life on the line in service to our country to do so.

That’s what Canada, Israel, Britain, Australia and most other allies do.

Tomorrow is the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Birmingham, to raise money and awareness for breast cancer research. Not running? Already donated? Here is a way to help and it won’t cost you a dime. Go to The Breast Cancer Site and click on the button to help provide free mammograms for women. You click, sponsors donate. And you can do it each day. So far over 2700 mammograms have been provided by clicking, and even more from store purchases from their site. And if you still have money to give, Carol could use a few more online donations before she runs tomorrow. And what a great day it will be for running.

>Let’s Ask, and Tell; and The Race for the Cure

October 12, 2007

>If I had known it just took a little publicity to run the litterbugs out, I would have done this long ago. But not one empty bottle or chicken box was tossed out here since my post yesterday. But the reality is…it’s cold and their windows were just rolled up. Auntie Litter, I’ve said it before, and I will say it again…we need you here.

From the “something’s not right” category…from 2003 through 2006 the military allowed 4,230 convicted felons to enlist under the “moral waivers” program.

Total waivers, inlcuding serious misdemeanors along with felonies, for 2006 were 8,129, and for the three years over 125,000 such waivers were granted.

But be a law abiding gay or lesbian seeking to enroll, and you will be denied. The Human Rights Campaign Legacy of Service Tour is hoping to change that. Former marine staff sergeant Eric Alva (the first U. S. serviceman wounded in Iraq) and others are telling their stories. Just one more date is currently on the schedule, in Dallas, but I am sure others will be added. We need to drop “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and allow everyone who wants to put their life on the line in service to our country to do so.

That’s what Canada, Israel, Britain, Australia and most other allies do.

Tomorrow is the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Birmingham, to raise money and awareness for breast cancer research. Not running? Already donated? Here is a way to help and it won’t cost you a dime. Go to The Breast Cancer Site and click on the button to help provide free mammograms for women. You click, sponsors donate. And you can do it each day. So far over 2700 mammograms have been provided by clicking, and even more from store purchases from their site. And if you still have money to give, Carol could use a few more online donations before she runs tomorrow. And what a great day it will be for running.

Riley says Slow Down, Edwards Upbeat

March 23, 2007


Yesterday we learned that Elizabeth Edwards, the wife of presidential candidate John Edwards, has a reoccurrence of her breast cancer that was announced just after the last presidential election.

While they thought after her treatment that her condition was cured, her cancer has now spread to her rib, the bones being one of the most common sites for this type of cancer to spread, and once in the bone, it is considered incurable. It is treatable, however, and both John and Elizabeth stress that it will be treated and I wish both of them the best, and strength, as they go through this.

They also both affirm that the campaign should and will go on.

Last week I did my PSA on Colon health, so today I will address breast cancer. Some of this information comes from a course I am taking, and some comes from the CDC web site.

Breast cancer is the MOST common cancer in women.

It is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women (lung cancer is the first).

In 2003, 181,646 women developed breast cancer and 41,619 died from it.

Men can develop breast cancer also. In 2003 1,826 men developed breast cancer and 379 men died from it.

2003 is the most recent year for which numbers are available.

Risk factors include:

Getting older
Having your first menstrual cycle at a younger age.
Starting menopause at an older age.
Being older at the birth of your first child.
Never giving birth.
Not breastfeeding.
Personal history of breast disease.
Family history of breast cancer.
Treatment with radiation to the breast/chest.
Long term use of hormone therapy.
Having changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.
Using birth control pills.
Drinking alcohol (more than one drink a day).
Not getting regular exercise.

Just as colonoscopies and eating right reduce your risk of colon cancer, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of breast cancer.

Control your weight, and exercise.
Know your family history of breast cancer.
Find out the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy, and birth control pills.
Limit the amount of alcohol you drink.
Get screened regularly. Screening includes self exams and clinical exams and mammograms. Mammograms are by far the most effective screening tool to reduce incidence and death from breast cancer.

For more information visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/, or
http://www.nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/breast/patient/, or
http://cms.komen.org/komen/index.htm


50 miles per hour. That is the new speed limit on downtown Birmingham’s interstates, ordered by Governor Riley. Will the drivers slow down from 75, uh, I mean 60, the current speed limit. Auto drivers are having to change their behavior because trucks can not secure their loads.

Auburn News:
The previously mentioned Auburn Tiger women’s basketball team moved a step closer to the NIT title by beating Virginia Tech yesterday.

Also, a big welcome to Jay Gouge as the 18th president of Auburn University. It’s interesting to have someone whose background, including a bachelor’s and master’s from Auburn, and a PhD from Michigan State, is in horticulture! I bet it was those flower beds that decorate the corners of the football stadium that attracted him.

>Riley says Slow Down, Edwards Upbeat

March 23, 2007

>
Yesterday we learned that Elizabeth Edwards, the wife of presidential candidate John Edwards, has a reoccurrence of her breast cancer that was announced just after the last presidential election.

While they thought after her treatment that her condition was cured, her cancer has now spread to her rib, the bones being one of the most common sites for this type of cancer to spread, and once in the bone, it is considered incurable. It is treatable, however, and both John and Elizabeth stress that it will be treated and I wish both of them the best, and strength, as they go through this.

They also both affirm that the campaign should and will go on.

Last week I did my PSA on Colon health, so today I will address breast cancer. Some of this information comes from a course I am taking, and some comes from the CDC web site.

Breast cancer is the MOST common cancer in women.

It is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women (lung cancer is the first).

In 2003, 181,646 women developed breast cancer and 41,619 died from it.

Men can develop breast cancer also. In 2003 1,826 men developed breast cancer and 379 men died from it.

2003 is the most recent year for which numbers are available.

Risk factors include:

Getting older
Having your first menstrual cycle at a younger age.
Starting menopause at an older age.
Being older at the birth of your first child.
Never giving birth.
Not breastfeeding.
Personal history of breast disease.
Family history of breast cancer.
Treatment with radiation to the breast/chest.
Long term use of hormone therapy.
Having changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.
Using birth control pills.
Drinking alcohol (more than one drink a day).
Not getting regular exercise.

Just as colonoscopies and eating right reduce your risk of colon cancer, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of breast cancer.

Control your weight, and exercise.
Know your family history of breast cancer.
Find out the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy, and birth control pills.
Limit the amount of alcohol you drink.
Get screened regularly. Screening includes self exams and clinical exams and mammograms. Mammograms are by far the most effective screening tool to reduce incidence and death from breast cancer.

For more information visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/, or
http://www.nci.nih.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/breast/patient/, or
http://cms.komen.org/komen/index.htm


50 miles per hour. That is the new speed limit on downtown Birmingham’s interstates, ordered by Governor Riley. Will the drivers slow down from 75, uh, I mean 60, the current speed limit. Auto drivers are having to change their behavior because trucks can not secure their loads.

Auburn News:
The previously mentioned Auburn Tiger women’s basketball team moved a step closer to the NIT title by beating Virginia Tech yesterday.

Also, a big welcome to Jay Gouge as the 18th president of Auburn University. It’s interesting to have someone whose background, including a bachelor’s and master’s from Auburn, and a PhD from Michigan State, is in horticulture! I bet it was those flower beds that decorate the corners of the football stadium that attracted him.