Archive for the ‘Birmingham resolution’ Category

>Pride Parade Update

May 24, 2008

>Kathy has posted that Rep. Patricia Todd says the mayor will allow a parade permit, or rather, leave it up to the police department. For real? How about banners? Let’s wait and see.

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Pride Parade Update

May 24, 2008

Kathy has posted that Rep. Patricia Todd says the mayor will allow a parade permit, or rather, leave it up to the police department. For real? How about banners? Let’s wait and see.

Birmingham is Slipping Again

May 24, 2008

First, though, know that I have written a column for The Western Tribune about John McCain and the release of his medical records and why they disqualify him from being president. Read it Wednesday, in the paper, or on this site.

Birmingham fell on its face last year.

Then Birmingham took a giant step forward.

Now, under the leadership of Larry Langford, Birmingham is renewing its old, tired attitude of intolerance and bigotry. Langford is refusing to grant Central Alabama Pride a parade permit for their annual Gay Pride Parade, which has been a part of the festivities of Pride since 1989.

Langford said “I just don’t condone the lifestyle”. Mayor, we might not condone your lifestyle either (and apparently the SEC and the justice department also doesn’t), but this is not about how one leads their life, it is about who one is, about one’s very being.

“It’s not a civil rights issue, its a personal choice issue.” Ignore science. Ignore medicine. Ignore all current knowledge about the origins of sexuality and call it a choice.

No, I will tell you what is a choice, Larry. Making a conscious decision to discriminate, to be intolerant, that is a choice, your choice.

Fortunately, the parade is not the main event of Pride, it is a “fun” event. But it plays an important role in that it allows families, gay and straight, to come together and enjoy floats and beads and candy. It allows people who are questioning their own sexuality to see from a distance (of sort) others who are out and comfortable that have been through what they are going through.

There are other events of Pride…10 days of events, including an art show, Pridefest with music and vendors, bowling, faith events and more. Central Alabama Pride

My advice to the organizers of Pride? Hold the parade in another city. Homewood, perhaps, or Tuscaloosa or (gasp!) Bessemer. Not that we can be sure mayors of those cities believe in equality, but you know, we need to know who our friends are.

And march with or without a permit up to city hall and into the next council meeting in protest. As of May 15 2007 Birmingham is an inclusive city that believes in acceptance and rejects intolerance and bigotry, according to the resolution. Stand up, Birmingham.

Kathy has a good write up about this too at Birmingham Blues.

>Birmingham is Slipping Again

May 24, 2008

>First, though, know that I have written a column for The Western Tribune about John McCain and the release of his medical records and why they disqualify him from being president. Read it Wednesday, in the paper, or on this site.

Birmingham fell on its face last year.

Then Birmingham took a giant step forward.

Now, under the leadership of Larry Langford, Birmingham is renewing its old, tired attitude of intolerance and bigotry. Langford is refusing to grant Central Alabama Pride a parade permit for their annual Gay Pride Parade, which has been a part of the festivities of Pride since 1989.

Langford said “I just don’t condone the lifestyle”. Mayor, we might not condone your lifestyle either (and apparently the SEC and the justice department also doesn’t), but this is not about how one leads their life, it is about who one is, about one’s very being.

“It’s not a civil rights issue, its a personal choice issue.” Ignore science. Ignore medicine. Ignore all current knowledge about the origins of sexuality and call it a choice.

No, I will tell you what is a choice, Larry. Making a conscious decision to discriminate, to be intolerant, that is a choice, your choice.

Fortunately, the parade is not the main event of Pride, it is a “fun” event. But it plays an important role in that it allows families, gay and straight, to come together and enjoy floats and beads and candy. It allows people who are questioning their own sexuality to see from a distance (of sort) others who are out and comfortable that have been through what they are going through.

There are other events of Pride…10 days of events, including an art show, Pridefest with music and vendors, bowling, faith events and more. Central Alabama Pride

My advice to the organizers of Pride? Hold the parade in another city. Homewood, perhaps, or Tuscaloosa or (gasp!) Bessemer. Not that we can be sure mayors of those cities believe in equality, but you know, we need to know who our friends are.

And march with or without a permit up to city hall and into the next council meeting in protest. As of May 15 2007 Birmingham is an inclusive city that believes in acceptance and rejects intolerance and bigotry, according to the resolution. Stand up, Birmingham.

Kathy has a good write up about this too at Birmingham Blues.

Birmingham Takes a Giant Step

May 15, 2007

The Birmingham City Council just passed a resolution of tolerance similar to the one defeated just weeks ago. This resolution promotes tolerance and respect for all residents and visitors, and condemns racism, bigotry, homophobia and other forms of discrimination, and encourages Birmingham to embrace diversity.

“Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama and it is an important part of us changing the hearts and minds of the people of this state, ” said Howard Bayless Board Chair of Equality Alabama. He went on to say, “Today is an important day for the LGBT community. Today is the day we can look to and say now we have a place here. We have a place in Alabama that we are WELCOMED.”

This is one spot in Alabama where progress is being made, and the work of Howard and Councilwoman Abbott and the many bloggers and email writers and others who made this possible are certainly appreciated.

Just on the heels of this we learned that Jerry Falwell has died. Falwell has been a voice for intolerance and homophobia, and lets hope that his message of bigotry and hatred dies with him. My condolences to his family.

>Birmingham Takes a Giant Step

May 15, 2007

>The Birmingham City Council just passed a resolution of tolerance similar to the one defeated just weeks ago. This resolution promotes tolerance and respect for all residents and visitors, and condemns racism, bigotry, homophobia and other forms of discrimination, and encourages Birmingham to embrace diversity.

“Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama and it is an important part of us changing the hearts and minds of the people of this state, ” said Howard Bayless Board Chair of Equality Alabama. He went on to say, “Today is an important day for the LGBT community. Today is the day we can look to and say now we have a place here. We have a place in Alabama that we are WELCOMED.”

This is one spot in Alabama where progress is being made, and the work of Howard and Councilwoman Abbott and the many bloggers and email writers and others who made this possible are certainly appreciated.

Just on the heels of this we learned that Jerry Falwell has died. Falwell has been a voice for intolerance and homophobia, and lets hope that his message of bigotry and hatred dies with him. My condolences to his family.

Birmingham: She’s fallen and she can’t get up.

March 29, 2007

Let me start by saying that I am really disappointed in aol email. I type in one address and the rest as blind carbon copies, and sometimes they just send it all as regular carbon copies. So this is an apology for what seems like mass carbons. They should be blind copies (and are on most days).

Yesterday’s post regarding the Birmingham resolution for inclusiveness that failed is the most popular blog posting I have done. And if email (local and from across the country) is any indication, it is an issue that people care deeply about. They are concerned about Birmingham’s image, and they are concerned about basic rights and safety for those of us who live in the area.

Most important is that when things like this happen people realize that change is not ineveitable, that even when we feel that we are progressing, unexpected turns may occur. That is not a time to run and hide, rather it makes us realize that we need to press on. And possibly those who have been complacent will be awakened and realize they need to become part of the process. Maybe they need to contact their representatives, or talk to their neighbors, to educate them about the issues of equality and justice. We can all do more.

I heard from people across town and across the country, and abroad, seeking direction or offering encouragement. Remember when I started this blog I said Bessemer was ready for change, and I think Birmingham is too. Mayor Kincaid said he was ready to sign this resolution and that Birmingham needed it. Well, he is right, but Bessemer needs it too. This resolution was not just about sexual orientation, as Ms. Witherspoon would have us to believe. It was about inclusion. And about not discriminating because of age, color, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender. Birmingham councilors would have you believe that race is the only type of discrimination that matters. It’s hard to imagine that a council person who is black and uses a wheelchair would speak so vehemently against this resolution and vote against it. But that is what happened.

People who are local and who are from other states, who are gay and who are straight, and who are white and who are of color, have said that this, once again, gives people across the nation (and the world, if readers of this blog are any indication) a bad impression of Birmingham. And they are right. They realize that you don’t have to be gay, or disabled, or a minority, to believe that people should be treated with respect. You don’t even have to “agree” with them to accept that their lives have value, and that they should be included in the broad quilt of diversity that make up the human race. Birmingham has fallen, and she can’t get up! Not without your help. Please read Jason’s comment below. That is one way to help!


The Lady Banks Rose is in full bloom now.

This large azalea is in the back yard.

The side of the house with dogwoods and azaleas.

>Birmingham: She’s fallen and she can’t get up.

March 29, 2007

>Let me start by saying that I am really disappointed in aol email. I type in one address and the rest as blind carbon copies, and sometimes they just send it all as regular carbon copies. So this is an apology for what seems like mass carbons. They should be blind copies (and are on most days).

Yesterday’s post regarding the Birmingham resolution for inclusiveness that failed is the most popular blog posting I have done. And if email (local and from across the country) is any indication, it is an issue that people care deeply about. They are concerned about Birmingham’s image, and they are concerned about basic rights and safety for those of us who live in the area.

Most important is that when things like this happen people realize that change is not ineveitable, that even when we feel that we are progressing, unexpected turns may occur. That is not a time to run and hide, rather it makes us realize that we need to press on. And possibly those who have been complacent will be awakened and realize they need to become part of the process. Maybe they need to contact their representatives, or talk to their neighbors, to educate them about the issues of equality and justice. We can all do more.

I heard from people across town and across the country, and abroad, seeking direction or offering encouragement. Remember when I started this blog I said Bessemer was ready for change, and I think Birmingham is too. Mayor Kincaid said he was ready to sign this resolution and that Birmingham needed it. Well, he is right, but Bessemer needs it too. This resolution was not just about sexual orientation, as Ms. Witherspoon would have us to believe. It was about inclusion. And about not discriminating because of age, color, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender. Birmingham councilors would have you believe that race is the only type of discrimination that matters. It’s hard to imagine that a council person who is black and uses a wheelchair would speak so vehemently against this resolution and vote against it. But that is what happened.

People who are local and who are from other states, who are gay and who are straight, and who are white and who are of color, have said that this, once again, gives people across the nation (and the world, if readers of this blog are any indication) a bad impression of Birmingham. And they are right. They realize that you don’t have to be gay, or disabled, or a minority, to believe that people should be treated with respect. You don’t even have to “agree” with them to accept that their lives have value, and that they should be included in the broad quilt of diversity that make up the human race. Birmingham has fallen, and she can’t get up! Not without your help. Please read Jason’s comment below. That is one way to help!


The Lady Banks Rose is in full bloom now.

This large azalea is in the back yard.

The side of the house with dogwoods and azaleas.