Archive for the ‘Alabama’ Category

>Progressive – it’s a good thing

June 25, 2010

>I guess I’m a little behind in this because this poll came out in May, but after considering the results I think its worth bringing everyone, including myself, up to date.

Progressivism is a good thing.

A Pew Research poll finds that 68% of Americans react favorably to the word “progressive” and only 23% react negatively.

This is a more favorable reaction than was found toward the word “capitalism” (52% positive, 37% negative).

Even among Republicans a majority (56%) reacted positive to “progressive.”

Now it could well be that respondents were thinking of Progressive spokesperson Flo when they answered the question.

Here is a surprising number that might help us to know what to expect in the future. The same percent of young people (ages 18-29) have a positive reaction to “socialism” (43%) as do “capitalism” (43%).

So what is it that progressives want to accomplish? The “progressive agenda” was put forth on Left in Alabama last month, and progressive bloggers got together to map out a course to accomplish some of these things.

On the national scene (these are not listed in order of priority because as progressives we believe that more than one problem can be tackled at a time):

1. Campaign finance and lobbying reform

2. Single payer health insurance, public option

3. Clean energy program, moving away from oil dependency

4. Immigration reform (secure borders, path to legitimacy for those here and who want to come here)

5. Infrastructure development program (public transportation, safety, national parks, historic reuse of historic buildings, energy reform and conservation)

6. Withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and Iraq

7. LGBT Equality

For the state of Alabama (not in order of priority):

1. A new Constitution

2. Ethics reform

3. Tax reform

4. Set and achieve higher educational goals

5. Infrastructure development program (energy conservation and green building)

6. LGBT equality

7. Moratorium on the death penalty

For the city of Bessemer (not in order of priority):

1. Establish a working relationship between the administration and the business community/ development board

2. Prioritize downtown development/historic preservation

3. Revitalize historic and other neighborhoods

4. Support community gardens project

5. Establish recreational opportunities (rec center, trail from Hall of History to Red Mountain Park using railroad trestle), public outdoor swimming pool

6. Improve and promote recycling options

For both state and local: Quit spending so much time on bingo!

What do you think of the progressive agendas laid out here, especially on the state and local levels? Elections are coming up, you know.

Another progressive posted What We Believe on Left in Alabama this morning.

This video from 21 years ago was recently rated most sexy video on some show I saw while searching for something worthwhile to watch. Chris Isaak – Wicked Game.

>Unions in Alabama

March 2, 2010

>Not civil unions.

No, it’s a new topic for Bessemer Opinions.

Labor unions.

A report in today’s Birmingham News reveals that union membership is up in the state. Alabama’s rate is 10.9% and that compares with surrounding states very favorably.

Georgia – 4.6
Mississippi – 4.8
Tennessee 5.3
Florida 5.8

Picture credit Bham News

Here’s the Bureau of Labor Statistics chart from which that data comes.

The Birmingham News says that the recession may be the cause of more workers organizing, but the recession is happening all around us, and in Florida, Mississippi and Tennessee the union membership rates went down, according to the chart. Georgia’s rose.

Union leaders in the state are baffled and were surprised at the numbers.

This is by far not my area of expertise, but I think it is interesting because unions are traditionally supportive of the democratic party and its policies. Now I know that rank and file union members, especially in Alabama, might not always follow the union recommendations, but still, it’s encouraging.

More important, its about workers being protected and treated fairly.

Here’s a video from the Southern California Sisters in the Brotherhood celebrating their union.

>Four books

February 26, 2010

>There are four books that should be required reading for anyone interested in learning why Alabama is the way it is.

You could add the 1901 Alabama constitution to the list of required reading also. I’ll have something to say about that in my Western Tribune column next week.

First, though, some housekeeping.

To the left you will see a button where you can donate to Bessemer Opinions. While you will never be required to pay to read what is on this site and my others, it does take time to research and produce the content that you see. So if you feel generous from time to time, and appreciate my effort to get the progressive blue message out in this red state, click on the button and make a donation. Thanks.

Carry Me Home, Birmingham, Alabama, The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, by Birmingham native Diane McWhorter, is a must read. Published in 2001, Carry Me Home is both a personal memoir and a historical account of the fall of segregation. If you are from Birmingham, you will recognize family names of the your friends and co-workers and you might be surprised by what you learn.

Alabama in the Twentieth Century by Wayne Flynt was published in 2004. Flynt is a Distinguished University Professor of History at Auburn University, and this book outlines the issues by topic rather than chronologically. The books is divided into three parts: Alabama’s Political Economy (starting with the 1901 Constitution), Alabama’s Society, and Alabama’s Culture (with a chapter titled What Would Jesus Do? Religion).


Slavery by Another Name by Douglas A. Blackmon was published in 2008. “Shocking…Eviscerates one of our school-children’s most basic assumption: that Slavery in America ended with the Civil War” is how the New York Times described this book. There was an article about it in the Birmingham News recently, but many of us heard the author during interviews on NPR or read of this story in the Wall Street Journal.

As if our history of slavery is not bad enough, what is exposed in this book should make very American look to the ground in shame. The photographs are particularly disturbing.

The book tells the history of a post civil war systematic re-enslavement of blacks in our state under the guise of law enforcement and justice and deals of human labor trafficking. It is a difficult book to read because the personal stories of the individuals are so tragic and so, unfair.


Trying Times, Alabama Photographs, 1917-1945, by Michael V. R. Thomason, was published in 1985. This book may be difficult to find but I might let you borrow mine. Or look at it over here.

This book is a photo-essay of the social and economic history of our state during those years. There is an introduction and a short commentary, and each photograph is accompanied by a paragraph explaining it.

Near the middle of the book, opened to pages 152 and 153, are two photographs. On the left hand side is a picture of a tenant farmer family in Greensboro in 1941, in their newspaper lined cabin, with a black and white cat curled up on the floor. On the facing page is a photo of a white family taken in 1939. The children have hookworm and the woman has pellagra. “Neither affliction was uncommon,” the caption informs us. Unexpectedly, under the bed in the photo, is a black doll, presumably belonging to one of the little white girls in the photo.

There are other good books about our history and society, bu these four can catch you up. What better on a cold winter evening than to turn off the tv (once the Olympics are done) and crack open a book that may do more than just educate you. It might lead to some self-discovery, and that means being honest with yourself and your feelings and beliefs, and that is always a good thing.

>Tyson’s appointment is illegal, it seems

February 5, 2010

>I’m wondering how much longer Mobile District Attorney John Tyson will be allowed to continue to break the law. Or did Governor Riley break the law in appointing him as commander of the Anti-Gambling Task Force?

Code of Alabama, Section 12-17-184 (11) All district attorneys and all full-time assistant district attorneys shall devote their entire time to the discharge of the duties of their respective offices, and each and every one of the officers are prohibited from practicing law, directly or indirectly, in any court of this state or of the United States, or in any other manner or form whatsoever, except in the discharge of the official duties of their offices.

Bob Martin (The Alabama Scene) says “the words ‘their entire time’ is not ambiguous.”

He also points out that the Alabama Constitution states, “No person may hold two offices of profit at one and the same time except justices of the peace, constables, notaries public, and commissioner of deeds.”

In the meantime, Greentrack owners have surrendered their liquor license
because the brief filed in Macon County by the Task force referred to a law that allows warrantless searches for anyone that holds an Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control Board license.

Over 2000 people have been put out of work because of Riley’s raids, and this is adding to the cost to Alabama taxpayers. There is also a personal cost to the individuals involved, some of whom are the sole breadwinners for their families.

Then there is the foolishness factor. But in Alabama we should be used to that.

>Religion in Alabama

February 16, 2009

>The following column was written by Mark Durm, a professor of psychology at Athens State University. The column appeared in The Decatur Daily on Saturday, Feb 14, 2009. (Be warned, you can’t read the articles online unless you are a paid subscriber.)

The poll referred to in the column is here. There you can compare the religiosity of all the states.

This interested me because I am so tired of hearing the New England States being criticised for their liberal views and the South, particularly Alabama, being praised for its Southern Baptist values. For all of our religion here in Alabama, what has it gotten us? Never mind our rankings in public education, our drop out rates, our regressive taxes, our rates of disease related to over consumption and smoking. Let’s just look at the following:

Just how religious is Alabama?

Mark Durm

I read with interest the article that appeared in the Feb. 7 issue of The
Decatur Daily, “How Religious Are You? Gallup Poll confirms it – Alabama is
highly religious and Vermont is not – but why?” This story reminds me of a
statement by Francis Bacon, “Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be
true.”

I argue that if one judges a state’s religiosity by its behavior (its
“walk,” not its “talk”), then Vermont is much more religious than Alabama.

Please understand I am as Southern as one can get; I was born and
raised in the South, and I have attended schools in four different southern
states. We in the South, however, do not walk our religion as well as we
talk it. I offer the following as food for critical thought, not
criticism.

Let’s compare Alabama to Vermont because that was the case in the
previous article. This comparison will be done by the rate of certain
behaviors per 100,000 population in both states, according to the 17th edition
of “State Rankings,” a reference book published by Morgan Quitno.

An individual is more than twice as likely to get murdered in Alabama
as compared to Vermont. Our state ranks 18th while Vermont ranks
34th.

Moreover, a woman is more apt to be raped in Alabama than in
Vermont. Alabama ranks 18th in this category while the New England
state comes in at 41.

Alarmingly, an individual is 11 times more apt to be robbed in Alabama
than in Vermont, and concerning aggravated assault, one is three times more
likely to be assaulted in Alabama.

The property crime rate is almost double in Alabama when compared to
Vermont. Likewise, an individual is almost twice as likely to be
burglarized in our Southern state.

On other personal issues, an Alabamian is three times more likely to
file personal bankruptcy than is a Vermonter. If one is religious,
shouldn’t he pay what he owes his fellow man?

The divorce rate is higher in Alabama then the state up North.
Alabama ranks fourth in the nation on divorce while Vermont ranks 21st. If
a person is religious, should not he or she be less apt to divorce?

Moreover, more babies are born to unmarried women in Alabama than
Vermont. Alabama is above the national average on this issue; Vermont is
below it.

Concerning AIDS, living in Alabama poses a threat of getting this
dreaded disease seven times higher than living in Vermont.

Therefore, someone living in Alabama is more apt to be murdered, raped,
assaulted, robbed, have a child out of wedlock, file bankruptcy, be divorced and
get AIDS than if living in Vermont.

So just how religious is Alabama?

But, then, recalling Bacon’s words, maybe Alabama prefers to believe
what Alabama prefers to be true.

>Davis for Governor? No thanks.

January 12, 2009

>Bob Martin, publisher of The Montgomery Independent, published a column recently about Artur Davis and his chances of becoming governor. Well, not exactly, because anybody with any sense can see that the chance of that happening is zero. The column was more about how Davis running for governor could assure Republican success in the governor’s race and other
races across the state.

Davis wants to follow Obama’s lead. Martin points out that while Obama polled 43% of the white vote nationally, he only received 10% in Alabama.

This says nothing about Davis. His charismatic personality and republican-like talk plays well in our state…to a point.

No, it says more about the people of Alabama. More on this later.

Davis has a good gig in Washington. He needs to stay there. Even though I don’t agree with him on a few many issues, if he drops out of congress, Sheila Smoot has threatened to run. Yikes!

Ok, back to the people of Alabama. Over the last few weeks there have been several letters in the Birmingham News about the Civil War and why it happened and such. People from our state still argue that it was not about slavery. They argue tax issues, trade issues, economic issues…but those things all lead back to the slavery issue.

Here are some quotes from the Declarations of Secession from several states.

South Carolina: “…A geographical line has been drawn across the Union, and all the States north of that line have united in the election of a man to the high office of President of the United States, whose opinions and purposes are hostile to slavery…”

Mississippi: “…Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery— the greatest material interest of the world…”

Alabama: “…Whereas, the election of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin to the offices of president and vice-president of the United States of America, by a sectional party, avowedly hostile to the domestic institutions* and to the peace and security of the people of the State of Alabama…” (*sugar coated term for slavery)

Georgia: “…A brief history of the rise, progress, and policy of anti-slavery and the political organization into whose hands the administration of the Federal Government has been committed will fully justify the pronounced verdict of the people of Georgia…”

Texas: “…We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable…”

Ok, that’s just picking and choosing quotes from a few of the declarations, but there is a common theme. Some of the states, with the benefits of previous declarations, were not as detailed, but like I said, just read them and you will see a common theme…the south did not want to give up slavery.

Look back at the quote from Alabama. That is the mentality that today’s white vote in Alabama evolved from. The “domestic institutions” of 1861 that allowed “peace and security” are comparable to the “domestic institution” of segregation that was overcome in the 1960’s. In 2010, the “peace and security” that might be important to the whites in the state might be disrupted by elevating a black to the position of governor, so it just won’t happen.

Alabama is slow to change. Davis running in 2010 will do nothing to bring change, especially as to which party holds the Governor’s seat.

>Alabama Events September 2008

September 7, 2008

>Here is an incomplete list of events happening around the state. Many of these came from Alabama Journey, a publication of AAA of Alabama. If you know of other events for September let me know and I will add them. I am not responsible for any errors, omissions, cancelations or changes. Check with the web site or phone number to confirm. Enjoy Alabama.

September 1 – October 31
Red Rock Corn Maze, Tuscumbia. Walter McWilliams Farm, Red Rock Road. (256) 380-3842; colbertcountytrourism.org .

September 8 – 14
Navistar LPGA Classic, Prattville. Robert Trent Jones Trail at Capitol Hill, Senator Course. (205) 769-1354 or (205) 262-2828; navistarlpgaclassic.com .

September 13
Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com .

September 13
Hank Williams 85th Birthday Celebration, Montgomery. Hank Williams Museum and Oakwood Cemetary Annex. (334) 262-3600; thehankwilliamsmuseum.com .

September 16-21
North Alabama State Fair, Muscle Shoals. North Alabama State Fairgrounds (256) 383-3247; northalabamastatefair.org .

September 19-21
WERA Nationals, Leeds. Barber Motorsports Park. (205) 327-7223 or (800)240-2300; barbermotorsports.com .

September 20
Seventh Annual Day of Equality, Birmingham. Doubletree Hotel (205) 445-4843; equalityalabama.org .

September 20
Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com .
pepperplacemarket.com

September 20
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Birthday Celebration, Montgomery. Fitzgerald Museum. (334) 264-4222

September 20
Grape Stomp, Harpersville. Morgan Creek Vineyards. (205) 672-2053; morgancreekwinery.com .

September 20- 27
Racking Horse World Celebration, Decatur. Celebration Arena (256) 353-7225; rackinghorse.com .

September 26-27
Foggy Hollow Bluegrass Gatherin’, Wellington. Foggy Hollow Farm. (256) 492-3700; foggyhollow.com .

September 26-28
Antique and Apple Festival, Moulton. 8483 Alabama Highway 157. (256) 974-5067; lawrencealabama.com .

September 26-28
Big Spring Jam, Huntsville. Big Spring Park, downtown. (256) 533-1953; bigspringjam.org .

September 27
Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com .

September 27
Harvest Fest, Demopolis. Gaineswood Antebellum House Museum. (334) 289-4846; preserveala.org .
September 27-28
Jubilee Festival, Daphne. Old Towne Daphne. (251) 621-8222; eschamber.com .

>Alabama Events August 2008

August 2, 2008

>OK , Blogger finally released my blog from being tagged as “spam,” a ridiculous accusation that affected thousands. I hope they have chastized their spambots and there is not a repeat.

Because we often don’t learn of events until too late to plan or go, here is an incomplete list of events happening around the state. Many of these came from Alabama Journey, a publication of AAA of Alabama. If you know of other events for August, let me know and I will add them. I am not responsible for any errors, omissions, cancelations or changes. Check with the web site or phone number to confirm. Enjoy Alabama.

August 2
DeKalb County Fiddlers’ Convention, Fort Payne. Fort Payne Middle School, discoverlookoutmountain.com

Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com

Wish a Blogger Happy Birthday, Bessemer. bessemeropinions.com

August 7-10

World’s Longest Yard Sale, Fort Payne. Lookout Mountain Parkway; tourdekalb.com

August 9

Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com

August 14-17

Thunder on the Gulf, Orange Beach. thunderonthegulf.com

August 15

Taste of the Eastern Shore, Daphne. Civic Center; tasteoftheeasternshore.com

August 16

Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com

Dawg Daze Art & Music Festival, Mountain Brook. Crestline Village; mtnbrookchamber.com

Music and Fireworks in the Vineyard, Harpersville. Morgan Creek Vineyard; morgancreekwinery.com

August 22-23

Rumble on Noble, Anniston. Downtown District; rumbleonnoble.com

Stokin’ the fire BBQ Festival, Birmingham. Sloss Furnace; slossfurnaces.com

August 23

Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com

Dauphin Street International Beer Festival, Mobile. Lower Dauphin Street Historic District; ncsmobile.com

1814 Tennessee Militia Living History Demonstration, Dadeville. Horseshoe Bend National Battlefield; nps.gov/hobe

Heart Walk, Birmingham. Regions Park; birminghamheartwalkkintera.org

Walk to Remember, Tuscaloosa. University Mall; caringdays.org

Yard Party for Art, Dothan. Wiregrass Museum of Art; wiregrassmuseum.org

August 23-24

Black Belt Folk Roots Festival, Eutaw. Old courthouse Square; (205)372-0525

August 24

Kitchens for CASA Tour, Huntsville. Various Locations; casamadisoncty.org

August 30

Pepper Place Market, Birmingham. 2nd Ave N; pepperplacemarket.com

Crape Myrtle Festival, Ardmore. Ardmore Area; ardmorechamberofcommerce.com

Glassner Autumn Challenge Century Ride, Pintlala. Pintlala Baptist Church; mgmbikeclub.org

August 31

Russell Lands Labor Day Weekend Concert, Alexander City. Lake Martin Ampitheater; russelllands.com

>Tuesday’s Primary…and the Alabama Sturgeon

June 2, 2008

>I will be surprised if this post ends up on Bessemer Opinions because, at least at this end, the “internets” (to quote our president) is acting funky.

Tomorrow is the Alabama Primary, and although we already had the presidential portion of our state primary, the rest of the offices are up for grabs Tuesday. Believe it or not, I only have a couple of comments.

Number one, if voting in the Democratic Primary, which everyone should, vote for Dan Weinrib for tax assessor. He is the incumbent, and even though his office slipped up a bit when assessing opponent Gaynell Hendrick’s tax liabilities, he took full responsibility. Dan came and spoke with us at an Alabama Stonewall meeting, and certainly is the most qualified candidate.

His opponent, Ms. Hendricks, you remember, played the race card and tried to prevent Patricia Todd from assuming the office she had won at the ballot box. We are moving past race based politics (one can dream, again) so we should move past her as well.

On the Republican side, there is not much to crow about, except for the Public Service Commission President race. Here there are three candidates. One is Twinkle Andress Cavanaugh, who has the endorsement of Mike Huckabee. That in itself is reason enough to vote against her, but in the ad he stresses that she is pro-life. Of course, that is the expected position of republicans, but does being pro-life have anything to do with the public service commission?

Then there is Matt Chancey, whose ads make me laugh every time, still, that I see them: “Radical environmentalists have stopped nuclear power and are the leading cause of our high energy bills.”

The leading cause of our high energy bills? Radical environmentalists? Which oil field covered desert sand does this guy have his head buried in? TVA may be interested in building a nuclear plant, and there are pros and cons of this type of alternative energy, but Matt…the Public Service Commission has no oversight over TVA and neither will you.

Also, Matt seems upset that the Alabama Sturgeon is being protected, saying “Recently, Alabama Power and others lost a lawsuit in federal court to remove a certain type of fish from the Endangered Species List. The fish in question is genetically identical to other fish not on the endangered list. But this did not stop environmental extremists, who care more about the habitat of one type of fish than they do about the habitat for human beings” on his web site.

But he fails to mention that Alabama Power Company’s customers are paying for both sides of the lawsuit, as our tax money funds the government side of the case and your (in Bessemer we don’t use Alabama Power) rate payments paid for Alabama Power’s side. A waste of your money, just like those stupid bird advertisements.

article about that.

As for the claim that the fish are genetically identical, Chancey needs to read this article, Genetic distinction of pallid, shovelnose, and Alabama sturgeon: emerging species and the US Endangered Species Act , by Donald Campton et al, published in Conservation Genetics in March 2000 ISSN 1566-0621 (Print) 1572-9737 (Online).

From the abstract: “Overall, these mtDNA results indicate significant reproductive isolation between pallid and shovelnose sturgeon in areas of natural sympatry, and recent evolutionary divergence of Alabama sturgeon. These mtDNA results provide the first molecular genetic evidence for distinguishing the three Scaphirhynchus species and, coupled with morphological and biogeographic data, indicate that pallid and Alabama Sturgeon should be evaluated as distinct species under theESA.”

“Recent evolutionary divergence.” Something that Chancey may not understand. But what it means is these three fish have/are in the process of becoming distinct species. OMG! Evolution, right before our eyes!

About the fishies

So, just don’t vote in the Republican primary, that is the solution to this problem.

Tuesday’s Primary…and the Alabama Sturgeon

June 2, 2008

I will be surprised if this post ends up on Bessemer Opinions because, at least at this end, the “internets” (to quote our president) is acting funky.

Tomorrow is the Alabama Primary, and although we already had the presidential portion of our state primary, the rest of the offices are up for grabs Tuesday. Believe it or not, I only have a couple of comments.

Number one, if voting in the Democratic Primary, which everyone should, vote for Dan Weinrib for tax assessor. He is the incumbent, and even though his office slipped up a bit when assessing opponent Gaynell Hendrick’s tax liabilities, he took full responsibility. Dan came and spoke with us at an Alabama Stonewall meeting, and certainly is the most qualified candidate.

His opponent, Ms. Hendricks, you remember, played the race card and tried to prevent Patricia Todd from assuming the office she had won at the ballot box. We are moving past race based politics (one can dream, again) so we should move past her as well.

On the Republican side, there is not much to crow about, except for the Public Service Commission President race. Here there are three candidates. One is Twinkle Andress Cavanaugh, who has the endorsement of Mike Huckabee. That in itself is reason enough to vote against her, but in the ad he stresses that she is pro-life. Of course, that is the expected position of republicans, but does being pro-life have anything to do with the public service commission?

Then there is Matt Chancey, whose ads make me laugh every time, still, that I see them: “Radical environmentalists have stopped nuclear power and are the leading cause of our high energy bills.”

The leading cause of our high energy bills? Radical environmentalists? Which oil field covered desert sand does this guy have his head buried in? TVA may be interested in building a nuclear plant, and there are pros and cons of this type of alternative energy, but Matt…the Public Service Commission has no oversight over TVA and neither will you.

Also, Matt seems upset that the Alabama Sturgeon is being protected, saying “Recently, Alabama Power and others lost a lawsuit in federal court to remove a certain type of fish from the Endangered Species List. The fish in question is genetically identical to other fish not on the endangered list. But this did not stop environmental extremists, who care more about the habitat of one type of fish than they do about the habitat for human beings” on his web site.

But he fails to mention that Alabama Power Company’s customers are paying for both sides of the lawsuit, as our tax money funds the government side of the case and your (in Bessemer we don’t use Alabama Power) rate payments paid for Alabama Power’s side. A waste of your money, just like those stupid bird advertisements.

article about that.

As for the claim that the fish are genetically identical, Chancey needs to read this article, Genetic distinction of pallid, shovelnose, and Alabama sturgeon: emerging species and the US Endangered Species Act , by Donald Campton et al, published in Conservation Genetics in March 2000 ISSN 1566-0621 (Print) 1572-9737 (Online).

From the abstract: “Overall, these mtDNA results indicate significant reproductive isolation between pallid and shovelnose sturgeon in areas of natural sympatry, and recent evolutionary divergence of Alabama sturgeon. These mtDNA results provide the first molecular genetic evidence for distinguishing the three Scaphirhynchus species and, coupled with morphological and biogeographic data, indicate that pallid and Alabama Sturgeon should be evaluated as distinct species under theESA.”

“Recent evolutionary divergence.” Something that Chancey may not understand. But what it means is these three fish have/are in the process of becoming distinct species. OMG! Evolution, right before our eyes!

About the fishies

So, just don’t vote in the Republican primary, that is the solution to this problem.